SPECTRUM

Chemical Fact Sheet

Chemical Abstract Number (CAS #) 100754
CASRN 100-75-4
SynonymsN-Nitrosopiperidine
Piperidine, 1-Nitroso-
Pyridine, hexahydro-N-nitroso-
Analytical Method EPA Method 8270
Molecular FormulaC5H10N2O

Link to the National Library of Medicine's Hazardous Substances
Database for more details on this compound.

Use N-Nitroso compounds are produced primarily as research chemicals and not for commercial purposes. N-Nitroso compounds
Apparent Color YELLOW OIL; Pale yellow
Boiling Point 217 DEG C @ 721 MM HG
Molecular Weight 114.15
Density 1.0631 @ 18.5 DEG C/4 DEG C
Environmental Impact N-nitrosopiperidine may form in natural ecosystems and food as a result of nitrosation of piperidine in the presence of nitrite. If released to soil, N-nitrosopiperidine (NPIP) is not likely to hydrolyze but leaching should be a significant removal process. In samples of amended and unamended sandy loam, 33-50% degradation of NPIP was observed after 30 days. If released to water, NPIP is not likely to hydrolyze or oxidize. Photolysis could potentially be a significant degradation mechanism because NPIP absorbs UV light greater than 290 nm (sunlight). Bioconcentration in aquatic organisms and adsorption to suspended solids or sediments should not be significant. If released to the atmosphere, NPIP in the vapor phase is predicted to react with photochemically generated hydroxyl radicals with an estimated half-life of 3.47 days at 25 deg C. Direct photolysis of particulate or vapor phase NPIP could potentially be an important degradation mechanism. Removal from the atmosphere by wet deposition may also occur. Exposure may result from ingestion of food, particularly processed meats, bacon, and cheeses, contaminated with NPIP or inhalation of cigarette smoke containing this compound.
Environmental Fate TERRESTRIAL FATE: If released to soil, N-nitrosopiperidine (NPIP) is not likely to hydrolyze but leaching through soil should be a significant removal process. 33% degradation of NPIP was observed in unamended sandy loam spiked with 25 ug NPIP N/g soil and incubated for 30 days in the dark at 30 deg C. Under the same conditions, 50% degradation of NPIP was observed in soil amended with wheat straw . AQUATIC FATE: If released to water, N-nitrosopiperidine (NPIP) is not likely to hydrolyze or oxidize by reaction with singlet oxygen or alkyl peroxyl radicals. Photolysis could potentially be an important degradation mechanism due to ultraviolet absorption maximum. Bioconcentration in aquatic organisms and adsorption to suspended solids or sediments are not expected to be significant transport processes. ATMOSPHERIC FATE: If released to the atmosphere, vapor phase N-nitrosopiperidine(NPIP) is predicted to react with photochemically generated hydroxyl radicals with an estimated half-life of 3.47 days at 25 deg C. Photolysis of particulate or vapor phase NPIP could potentially be an important degradation mechanism. Based on the estimated complete water solubility of NPIP, removal from the atmosphere by wet deposition may occur. EFFL: Trace levels (<0.6 ppb) of N-nitrosopiperidine (NPIP) were detected in municipal sludge from Boston and Galveston . Levels of 0.03 ug/l NPIP were reported to be found in waste water from 1 of 19 chemical factories .

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