SPECTRUM

Chemical Fact Sheet

Chemical Abstract Number (CAS #) 101428
CASRN 101-42-8
SynonymsFenuron
Urea, N,N-dimethyl-N'-phenyl-
1,1-Dimethyl-3-phenylurea
N,N-Dimethyl-N'-phenylurea
Analytical Method EPA Method 632
Molecular FormulaC9H12N2O

Link to the National Library of Medicine's Hazardous Substances
Database for more details on this compound.

Use Weed and brush killer. Control of woody plants and deep rooted perennial weeds, particularly on non crop land. Often used in combination with chloropropham to extend the weed spectrum and range of crops.
Apparent Color White, crystalline solid; Colorless crystalline solid; Colorless crystals
Melting Point 133-134 deg C
Molecular Weight 164.21
Density 1.08 at 20 deg C/20 deg C
Sensitivity Data Non-irritating to skin
Environmental Impact Fenuron may be released to the environment primarily during its use as a herbicide. If released to the atmosphere, degradation of vapor-phase fenuron by reaction with photochemically produced hydroxyl radicals (estimated half-life of 2.3 hrs) will be important. Photolysis may be important and particulate-phase fenuron will be removed from air via dry deposition. If released to soil, biodegradation will be the primary fate process. A complete degradation half-life of 2.2-4.5 months was measured for fenuron in soil. Photolysis may be important on soil surfaces exposed to sunlight. Adsorption to soil will not be important. In water, volatilization, adsorption to sediment, hydrolysis and bioconcentration in aquatic organisms will not be important. Biodegradation is expected to be the primary fate process and some photodegradation may occur. Workers may be exposed via dermal contact and inhalation of dust.
Environmental Fate TERRESTRIAL FATE: In soil, enzymic and microbial degradation involves step by step N-demethylation. TERRESTRIAL FATE: The complete degradation of fenuron in soil has been experimentally determined to be 4.5 months at 15 deg C and 2.2 months at 30 deg C . Biodegradation will be the primary fate process in soil . Measured Kocs of 27 and 43 indicate that adsorption to soil will not be important. A visible change in color occurred within 2 hours when paper saturated with fenuron was exposed to sunlight suggesting that some fenuron may be removed from soil surfaces via direct photolysis. AQUATIC FATE: After 2 weeks, approximately 20% of 10 ug/L fenuron remained in raw river water samples exposed to sunlight and artificial fluorescent light . Biodegradation is expected to be the primary fate process in aquatic ecosystems(2,SRC). Measured Kocs of 27 and 43 indicate that adsorption of fenuron from the water column to sediment and suspended material will not be important. An estimated BCF of 6 indicates that fenuron will not bioconcentrate in fish. A visible change in color occurred within 2 hours when paper saturated with fenuron was exposed to sunlight suggesting that some fenuron may be removed from water via direct photolysis. Volatilization from water will not be important(7) based on a low Henry's Law constant of 1.68X10-10 atm-cu m/mole at 25 deg C(6,SRC). ATMOSPHERIC FATE: Based on a measured water solubility of 4,027 mg/L at 25 deg C and an estimated Henry's Law constant of 9.71X10-10 atm-cu m/mole at 25 deg C , the vapor pressure of fenuron can be estimated to be 1.81E-5 mm Hg at 25 deg C. This vapor pressure value suggests that fenuron will exist in the vapor and particulate phases in the ambient atmosphere . Vapor-phase fenuron is rapidly degraded in the ambient atmosphere by reaction with photochemically formed hydroxyl radicals; the half-life for this reaction in air can be estimated to be about 2.3 hrs(4,SRC). A visible change in color occurred within 2 hours when paper saturated with fenuron was exposed to sunlight suggesting that fenuron may be removed from the atmosphere via direct photolysis. Particulate-phase fenuron is removed via dry deposition.
Drinking Water Impact SURFACE WATER: Fenuron was qualitatively detected in river water .

DISCLAIMER - Please Read

Florida-Spectrum List of Services
Florida-Spectrum Homepage