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Chemical Fact Sheet

Chemical Abstract Number (CAS #) 101553
CASRN 101-55-3
Synonyms4-Bromophenyl phenyl ether
1-Bromo-4-phenoxybenzene
Benzene, 1-bromo-4-phenoxy-
Analytical Methods EPA Method 611
EPA Method 625
EPA Method 8110
EPA Method 8270
Molecular FormulaC12H9BrO

Link to the National Library of Medicine's Hazardous Substances
Database for more details on this compound.

Use RESEARCH CHEMICAL Used as flame retardant additives in polymers. Former use
Boiling Point 310.1 DEG C @ 760 MM HG
Melting Point 18.7 DEG C
Molecular Weight 249.11
Density 1.4208 @ 20 DEG C/4 DEG C
Environmental Impact The source of release of 4-bromophenyl phenyl ether which has been detected in drinking and surface waters is not clear; however, it may be possible that 4-bromophenyl phenyl ether is formed during chlorination treatment of sewage and drinking water. If released to water, 4-bromophenyl phenyl ether may adsorb significantly to sediment and suspended material. If strong adsorption is occurring, volatilization from water may not be important. However, in the absence of strong adsorption, volatilization half lives of 16.5 and 185 hrs can be estimated for a model river and environmental pond, respectively. A potential for significant bioconcentration in aquatic organisms may be possible based on an estimated Log Kow of 5.243. If released to soil, significant leaching is not expected to occur due to strong soil adsorption. A single biodegradation study suggests that 4-bromophenyl phenyl ether is resistant to biodegradation. If released to the atmosphere, 4-bromophenyl phenyl ether is expected to exist primarily in the gas-phase where it will degrade relatively rapidly by reaction with photochemically formed hydroxyl radicals; the half-life for this reaction can be estimated to be about 1.3 days in average air. The general population may be exposed to 4-bromophenyl phenyl ether through consumption of contaminated drinking water.
Environmental Fate TERRESTRIAL FATE: Based on a Koc value of 17000, which was estimated from a Log Kow of 5.243(1,2,SRC), 4-bromophenyl phenyl ether is not expected to leach significantly in most soil systems. No data are available pertaining to chemical degradation processes for 4-bromophenyl phenyl ether in soil. A single biodegradation study suggests that 4-bromophenyl phenyl ether is resistant to biodegradation . AQUATIC FATE: Adsorption to sediment and volatilization may be important environmental fate processes for 4-bromophenyl phenyl ether in water. Based on a Koc value of 17000, which was estimated from a log Kow of 5.243(1,2,SRC), significant partitioning from the water column to sediment and suspended material is possible. If the effects of adsorption are not considered, volatilization half-lives of 16.5 and 185 hrs can be estimated from a model river and environmental pond, respectively(2,3,SRC). With strong adsorption occurring, the volatilization half-life from the pond can be estimated to be 60 months(3,SRC). The relative importance of volatilization is therefore dependent upon the existent of adsorption. The estimated log Kow of 5.243 also suggests a potential for significant bioconcentration in aquatic organisms. A single biodegradation study suggests that 4-bromophenyl phenyl ether is resistant to biodegradation . Aquatic hydrolysis and oxidation (via singlet oxygen and peroxy radicals) are not important . ATMOSPHERIC FATE: Based on an extrapolated vapor pressure of 0.0015 mm Hg at 20 deg C(1,SRC), 4-bromophenyl phenyl ether can be expected to exist almost entirely in the vapor phase in the ambient atmosphere(2,SRC). Vapor phase 4-bromophenyl phenyl ether is expected to be degraded relatively rapidly in the atmosphere by reaction with photochemically formed hydroxyl radicals(3,SRC); the half-life for this reaction in average air has been estimated to be approximately 1.3 days(3,SRC). AQUATIC FATE: No information was found in the reviewed literature that would indicate hydrolysis as an aquatic fate for this cmpd. It is considered to be unlikely that any of the covalent bonds of 4-bromophenyl phenyl ether will hydrolyze at ambient environmental conditions, since the negative charge-density of the aromatic ring will impede the nucleophilic attack of water or hydroxide ion. AQUATIC FATE: No information was found in the reviewed literature that would support any role for oxidn of this cmpd as an aquatic fate. Indirect photolysis involving interaction of hydroxyl radical with the aromatic ring, is considered to be too slow in water to be environmentally significant for this cmpd. It is at present uncertain how much of this pollutant will volatilize into the atmosphere from surface waters. Any 4-bromophenyl phenyl ether that enters into the troposphere will be subject to photodegradation & reprecipitation with rain. The proposed/ atmospheric half-life of unsubstituted benzene is 2.4 to 24 hr. A halogen substituent on an aromatic ring should decrease its susceptibility to photodegradation in the troposphere. Although the electron donating resonance effect of an oxygen substituent should facilitate destruction, it is uncertain how the presence of both groups will affect the atmospheric destruction of 4-bromophenyl phenyl ether.
Drinking Water Impact SURFACE WATER: In an analysis of the US EPA STORET Data Base, 4-bromophenyl phenyl ether was positively detected in 0.1% of 840 water observation points at a median concn below 10 ppb . 4-Bromophenyl phenyl ether has been qualitatively detected in raw water taken from the mississippi river (in LA) in 1970 DRINKING WATER: 4-Bromophenyl phenyl ether has been qualitatively detected in raw and finished drinking water taken from the Mississippi R (in LA) in 1970, in finished drinking water collected in Cincinnati, OH in Jan 1976, and in unspecified finished drinking water (from the USA) collected in July 1975 . EFFL: In an analysis of the US EPA STORET Data Base, 4-bromophenyl phenyl ether was positively detected in 1.2% of 1243 water observation points at a median concn below 10 pp .

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