SPECTRUM

Chemical Fact Sheet

Chemical Abstract Number (CAS #) 101804
CASRN 101-80-4
Synonyms4,4'-Oxydianiline
4,4'-Diaminodiphenyl ether
Molecular FormulaC12H12N2O

Link to the National Library of Medicine's Hazardous Substances
Database for more details on this compound.

Use CHEM INT FOR POLYIMIDE & POLY(ESTER-IMIDE) RESINS
Apparent Color Colorless crystals
Boiling Point >300 deg C
Melting Point 186-187 deg C
Molecular Weight 200.26
Environmental Impact 4,4'-Diaminodiphenyl ether could be released to the environment in waste streams from its production and use in formulating polymides If released to the atmosphere, vapor-phase 4,4'-diaminodiphenyl ether is expected to degrade rapidly (estimated half-life of 1.8 hr) by reaction with photochemically produced hydroxyl radicals. Particulate phase 4,4'-diaminodiphenyl ether may be removed from the atmosphere via dry deposition. If released to soil, 4,4'-diaminodiphenyl ether may undergo a covalent chemical bonding with humic materials which can result in its chemical alteration to a latent form and prevent leaching. In the absence of covalent bonding, moderate leaching may be possible. If released to water, hydrolysis, volatilization and bioconcentration in aquatic organisms are not expected to be important aquatic fate processes. Covalent bonding with humic materials in the water column and sediments may result in partitioning from the water column to sediments. By analogy to the aromatic amine chemical class, 4,4'-diaminodiphenyl ether in the water column may be susceptible to photooxidation via hydroxyl and peroxy radicals. Insufficient data are available to assess the relative importance of biodegradation of 4,4'-diaminodiphenyl ether in soil or water. In occupational settings, workers may be exposed to 4,4'-diaminodiphenyl ether through inhalation of dust and through eye and skin contact.
Environmental Fate TERRESTRIAL FATE: When released to soil, 4,4'-diaminodiphenyl ether, by analogy to the aromatic amine chemical class, may undergo covalent chemical bonding with humic materials which can result in its chemical alteration to a latent form and tight adsorption . When covalently bound in this latent form, leaching in soil systems is not generally expected to occur. This covalent bonding proceeds in two steps; a rapid and reversible bonding followed by a slower and much less reversible reaction . Leaching in soil may be possible prior to the occurrence of the slower bonding reaction. In the absence of covalent bonding, moderate leaching may be possible (Koc value of 315)(2-3). Insufficient data are available to assess the relative importance of biodegradation of 4,4'-diaminodiphenyl ether in soil. AQUATIC FATE: By analogy to other aromatic amines , 4,4'-diaminodiphenyl ether may undergo covalent bonding with humic materials in the water column and in sediment; partitioning from the water column to sediment and suspended material may therefore be an important removal process from water. 4,4'-Diaminodiphenyl ether in the water column may be susceptible to photooxidation via hydroxyl and peroxy radicals based on analogy to other aromatic amines . Insufficient data are available to assess the relative importance of biodegradation of 4,4'-diaminodiphenyl ether in water. A BCF value of 22 suggests that 4,4'-diaminodiphenyl ether will not bioconcentrate in aquatic organisms. Furthermore, aquatic hydrolysis and volatilization do not appear to be environmentally important removal processes of 4,4'-diaminodiphenyl ether in water. ATMOSPHERIC FATE: Based upon an estimated vapor pressure of 3.07X10-7 mm Hg at 25 deg C , 4,4'-diaminodiphenyl ether is expected to exist in both the vapor and particulate phases in the ambient atmosphere . Vapor phase 4,4'-diaminodiphenyl ether is degraded rapidly in an average ambient atmosphere by reaction with photochemically produced hydroxyl radicals at an estimated half-life of about 1.8 hr . Particulate phase 4,4'-diaminodiphenyl ether may be removed from the atmosphere via dry deposition.

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