SPECTRUM

Chemical Fact Sheet

Chemical Abstract Number (CAS #) 103231
CASRN 103-23-1
SynonymsBis(2-ethylhexyl) adipate
Hexanedioic acid, bis(2-ethylhexyl) ester
Di(2-ethylhexyl) adipate
Adipic acid, bis(2-ethylhexyl) ester
Analytical Method EPA Method 525
Molecular FormulaC22H42O4

Link to the National Library of Medicine's Hazardous Substances
Database for more details on this compound.

Use Plasticizer, commonly blended with general purpose plasticizers, such as DOP and DIOP in processing polyvinyl and other polymers; solvent; aircraft lubes Functional (hydraulic) fluid Plasticizer or solvent in the following cosmetics: bath oils, eye shadow, cologne, foundations, rouge, blusher, nail-polish remover, moisturizers and indoor tanning preparations PVC film now used in meat wrapping operations contains bis(2-ethyl hexyl) adipate (DOA) as its major plasticizer.
Consumption Patterns 100% AS A VINYL PLASTICIZER (EST)(1976)
Apparent Color COLORLESS OR VERY PALE AMBER LIQ ; Light colored, oily liquid.
Odor SLIGHT AROMATIC SMELL
Boiling Point 214 DEG C @ 5 MM HG
Melting Point -67.8 DEG C
Molecular Weight 370.58
Density 0.922 @ 25 DEG C/4 DEG C
Sensitivity Data Liquid irritating to the eyes.
Environmental Impact Di(2-ethylhexyl) adipate may be released into the environment during its manufacture and distribution, during PVC blending operations and from commercial and consumer use of finished products. It can also be released in emissions from waste incineration and from leaching from plastics where it is used as a plasticizer. If released to air, di(2-ethylhexyl) adipate can exist in both vapor and particulate phases. The vapor phase will degrade relatively rapidly by reaction with photochemically produced hydroxyl radicals (estimated half-life of 16 hr). The particulate phase can be physically removed from air by wet and dry deposition. If released to soil or water, di(2-ethylhexyl) adipate is expected to biodegrade; screening tests have shown that di(2-ethylhexyl) adipate biodegrades readily. Estimated Koc values of 5004-48,600 suggest that di(2-ethylhexyl) adipate will be relatively immobile in soil (and not leach) and should partition from the water column to sediment in the aquatic environment. Occupational exposure can occur through dermal contact and inhalation. The general population can be exposed through consumption of foods stored in plastic films; di(2-ethylhexyl) adipate is used as plasticizer in various food storage wraps and it has been shown to migrate into stored foods.
Environmental Fate TERRESTRIAL FATE: The dominant degradation process in the soil environment is expected to be microbial degradation. Biodegradation test results indicate that di(2-ethylhexyl) adipate is readily biodegradable(1-2). Estimated Koc values of 5004 and 48,600(3-4,SRC) indicate that di(2-ethylhexyl) adipate will be relatively immobile in soil and will not leach(5,SRC). Aqueous hydrolysis in moist soil is not expected to be important except in very alkaline conditions (pH 9 or higher)(6,SRC). AQUATIC FATE: The dominant degradation process in the aquatic environment is expected to be microbial degradation . Biodegradation test results indicate that di(2-ethylhexyl) adipate is readily biodegradable(1-2). Estimated Koc values of 5004 and 48,600(3-4,SRC) suggest that di(2-ethylhexyl) adipate will partition from the water column to sediment and suspended material(1,SRC). Volatilization is expected to be very slow and not environmentally important. A measured BCF of 27 in blue-gill fish indicates that bioconcentration is not important; however, it appears that fish are able to metabolize di(2-ethylhexyl) adipate which results in low BCF values . Bioconcentration may be important in aquatic organisms that can not metabolize di(2-ethylhexyl) adipate. Aqueous hydrolysis is not expected to be important except in very alkaline waters (pH 9 or higher)(5,SRC). ATMOSPHERIC FATE: Based upon a measured vapor pressure of 8.5X10-7 mm Hg at 20 deg C , di(2-ethylhexyl) adipate may exist in both the vapor phase and particulate phase in the ambient atmosphere(2,SRC); at 20 deg C, the vapor phase may dominate(2,SRC). Di(2-ethylhexyl) adipate is degraded rapidly in the vapor phase by reaction with photochemically produced hydroxyl radicals with an estimated half-life of about 16 hr(3,SRC). Particulate phase di(2-ethylhexyl) adipate will be removed from air physically by dry and wet deposition processes.
Drinking Water Impact IT IS AMONG ORG CONTAMINANTS FOUND IN DRINKING WATER WITH HIGHEST CONCN IN FINISHED WATER BEING 20.0 UG/L. FROM TABLE DRINKING WATER: A tap water sample taken from Tobata-ku, Kitakyushu, Japan (sampling date not reported) contained a di(2-ethylhexyl) adipate concn of 77 ppb . A finished drinking water sample collected from a Philadelphia treatment plant in Aug 1977 contained a di(2-ethylhexyl) adipate concn of 0.002 ppb . A di(2-ethylhexyl) adipate concn of 0.1 ug/L was detected in finished drinking water sample taken from a New Orleans treatment plant in July 1974 . Di(2-ethylhexyl) adipate was qualitatively detected in drinking water samples collected from treatment facilities in Cincinnati, OH (Oct 1978), Miami, FL (Feb 1976), New Orleans, LA (Jan 1976), and Ottumwa, IO (Sep 1976) . SURFACE WATER: Di(2-ethylhexyl) adipate was detected in the Delaware River at levels of 0.08-0.3 ppb during the winter of 1977 and 0.02-0.3 ppb during the summer of 1976 . Di(2-ethylhexyl) adipate was detected at levels between 1 and 30 ppb in surface water samples taken from the Monatiquot River in MA during Mar 1973 . Concns of 130 ng/L and 35 ng/L were detected in Mississippi River water collected from Lake Itasca, Minnesota (source of the river) and from New Orleans, LA, respectively, in the summer of 1984 . Di(2-ethylhexyl) adipate was detected (detection limit of 0.2 ug/L) in water samples collected in Aug 1982 from 5 of 23 US sites at levels of 0.2-1.0 ug/L ; samples with positive detections were from the Ohio River (PA), Lake Ontario, Mississippi River (below St Louis), Mississippi River (Memphis, TN) and San Francisco Bay . EFFL: Di(2-ethylhexyl) adipate concns of 2-70 ppb were detected in effluent waters collected from three NJ POTW (publicly owned treatment works) that were sampled three times during a 1-yr period ; two of the plants were in industrial areas while the third was in a rural area with no known industrial input ; however, the rural POTW had the highest detected concn . Di(2-ethylhexyl) adipate was detected in 9 of 28 wastewater samples (detection limit 1 ppb) taken from waste treatment plants, industrial effluents and polluted fiords in Norway . A wastewater effluent collected from a chemical plant on the Delaware River in Aug 1977 contained a di(2-ethylhexyl) adipate concn of 2000 ppb . Di(2-ethylhexyl) adipate was qualitatively detected in water samples collected from advanced waste treatment facilities in Lake Tahoe, CA (Oct 1974), Pomona, CA (Sep 1974), Orange County, CA (Jan 1976), and Washington, DC (Sep 1974) .

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