SPECTRUM

Chemical Fact Sheet

Chemical Abstract Number (CAS #) 106434
CASRN 106-43-4
Synonymsp-Chlorotoluene
Analytical Methods EPA Method 502.2
EPA Method 503.1
EPA Method 524.2
EPA Method 8010
EPA Method 8021
Molecular FormulaC7H7Cl

Link to the National Library of Medicine's Hazardous Substances
Database for more details on this compound.

Use SOLVENT & INTERMEDIATE FOR ORG CHEMICALS & DYES CHEMICAL INTERMEDIATE; SPECIALTY SOLVENT DISINFECTANT AGAINST COCCIDIA OOCYSTS WITH LOW TOXICITY TO FOWL.
Apparent Color Colorless liquid
Boiling Point 161.99 DEG C
Melting Point 7.5 deg C
Molecular Weight 126.59
Density 1.0697 @ 20 deg C/4 deg C
Sensitivity Data strong irritant
Environmental Impact p-Chlorotoluene may be released to the environment in emissions and effluents from sites of its manufacture or industrial use, from venting during storage an transport, and from disposal of industrial waste products which contain this compound (ie spent solvent). p-Chlorotoluene may be formed in the environment as a photodegradation product of p-chlorobenzyl chloride, a chemical intermediate. If released to soil, p-chlorotoluene is expected to have very low mobility and should volatilize fairly rapidly from soil surfaces. Due to a lack of data, the significance of biodegradation in soil or water is not known. However, isolated bacteria have been found to metabolize p-chlorotoluene to its respective catechol via cis-dihydrodiol. If released to water, volatilization (half-life in a model river 3.5 hours), sensitized photolysis, and adsorption to suspended solids and sediments are predicted to be important fate processes. The relative importance of these fate processes and the rate of compound loss are expected to vary depending upon ambient conditions and characteristics of the water body. Based on monitoring data, the half-life of p-chlorotoluene in a river 4-5 m deep during mid-summer was estimated to be 1.2 days. This compound is not expected to undergo chemical hydrolysis, react with oxidants found in natural waters or bioaccumulate significantly in aquatic organisms. If released to the atmosphere, the dominant removal mechanism for p-chlorotoluene is expected to be reaction with photochemically generated hydroxyl radicals (half-life 8.4 days). A slight potential also exists for direct photolysis in the atmosphere. The most probable route of human exposure to p-chlorotoluene is inhalation of contaminated air. Segments of the population may also be exposed to ingestion of contaminated drinking water.
Environmental Fate TERRESTRIAL FATE: If released to soil, p-chlorotoluene is expected to have very low mobility and should volatilize fairly rapidly from both wet and dry soil surfaces. Chemical hydrolysis should not be environmentally important. Due to a lack of data, the significance of biodegradation is not known. However, isolated bacteria have been found to metabolize p-chlorotoluene to its respective catechol via cis-dihydrodiol. AQUATIC FATE: If released to water, volatilization (half-life in a model river 3.5 hours), sensitized photolysis, and adsorption to suspended solids and sediments are predicted to be important fate processes. The relative importance of these fate processes and the rate of compound loss are expected to vary depending on ambient conditions and characteristics of the water body. This compound is not expected to undergo chemical hydrolysis, react with oxidants found in natural waters or bioaccumulate significantly in aquatic organisms. Due to a lack of data, the significance of biodegradation is not known. However, isolated bacteria have been found to metabolize p-chlorotoluene to its respective catechol via cis-dihydrodiol. Based on monitoring data from the River Rhine, the half-life of p-chlorotoluene in a river 4-5 m deep during mid-summer was estimated to be 1.2 days . Based on a vapor pressure of 2.6 mm Hg at 20 deg C , p-chlorotoluene is expected to exist almost entirely in the vapor phase in the atmosphere. The dominant removal mechanism is expected to be reaction with photochemically generated hydroxyl radicals (half-life 8.4 days). Slight potential exists for direct photolysis in the atmosphere. A water solubility of 106 mg/l at 20 deg C suggests that some p-chlorotoluene may be removed from the atmosphere in precipitation(3,SRC); however, much of this loss should be returned to the atmosphere by volatilization.
Drinking Water Impact DRINKING WATER: 1975 National Organics Reconnaissance Survey (NORS) 10 city survey, identified in finished drinking water from 1 out of 10 cities - Miami, FL, 1.5 ug/l . GROUNDWATER: As of June 1984, analyzed for, but not found in 1174 community wells amd 617 private wells in Wisconsin, detection limit 1.0-5.0 ug/l . During 1981-1982, analyzed for but not found in 945 wells scattered throughout the USA (detection limit 0.2-0.5 ug/l) . SURFACE WATER: 1976, River Maas at Eysden (The Netherlands), median concn 0.1 ug/l, concn range not detected-0.3 ug/l . 1976, River Maas at Keizersveer (The Netherlands), median concn 0.1 ug/l, concn range not detected-0.2 ug/l . July 1979, River Rhine at Lobith (The Netherlands), 0.03 ug/l . EFFL: Identified in chlorinated leachate from a simulated landfill lysimeter used to study codisposal of metal plating sludge with municipal solid waste . Identified as a principal organic hazardous consitiuent (POHC) in the emissions from an incinerator test burn .

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