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Chemical Fact Sheet

Chemical Abstract Number (CAS #) 106503
CASRN 106-50-3
Synonymsp-Phenylenediamine
1,4-Benzenediamine
Molecular FormulaC6H8N2

Link to the National Library of Medicine's Hazardous Substances
Database for more details on this compound.

Use Dyeing furs; also in photochemical measurements, accelerating vulcanization; manuf azo dyes. CHEM INT FOR DYES (EG, DIRECT BLACK 19, 78 & 80); OXIDN BASE 10 & DEVELOPER 13 FOR DYES; CHEM INT FOR ARAMID FIBERS (USED IN TIRE CORD); CHEM INT FOR N,N'-DISUBSTITUTED-P-PHENYLENEDIAMINES; COMPONENT OF GASOLINE ANTIOXIDANTS.
Apparent Color WHITE TO SLIGHTLY RED CRYSTALS; WHITE PLATES FROM BENZENE, ETHER
Boiling Point 267 DEG C
Melting Point 145-147 DEG C
Molecular Weight 108.14
Density Greater than 1 (water= 1)
Sensitivity Data Is a skin and respiratory system sensitizer Eye irritation.
Environmental Impact p-Phenylenediamine (1,4-benzenediamine) may enter the environment as emissions or in wastewater during its manufacture and use as an intermediate in the manufacture of diisocyanates for polyurethane; antioxidants and accelerators for rubber and azo dyes and use in dye mixtures for hair and fur and photographic developing chemicals. If released on land it may leach to groundwater; however it may form covalent bonds to humic material which would limit movement through soil. It will not be expected to hydrolyze or evaporate appreciably in soils or on surfaces. If released to water it will not be expected to adsorb to sediments, bioconcentrate in aquatic organisms, hydrolyze, or evaporate appreciably. It will be expected to autooxidize and react with peroxyl radicals and may directly photolyze and biodegrade. If released to the atmosphere it will be subject to direct photolysis and autooxidation. It will react with photochemically produced hydroxyl radicals (estimated half-life of 14.14 hrs) and should be subject to significant rainout. Human exposure will be primarily occupational, with significant dermal exposure possible from use of dyes containing p-phenylenediamine.
Environmental Fate TERRESTRIAL FATE: If p-phenylenediamine (1,4-benzenediamine) is released on land, it may be subject to leaching due to its high water solubility and low estimated adsorption coefficient. However, since aromatic amines are known to form covalent bonds with humic materials, leaching may not be significant. It will not be expected to appreciably hydrolyze or evaporate significantly. Since it has exhibited variable biodegradability using activated and acclimated sludges and adapted mixed cultures, p-phenylenediamine may undergo biodegradation in soils. AQUATIC FATE: If released to water, p-phenylenediamine (1,4-benzenediamine) will not be expected to bioconcentrate in aquatic organisms, hydrolyze or evaporate appreciably. It will be expected to autooxidize as well as react with alkyl peroxy radicals. Since it adsorbs UV light above 290 nm it may undergo significant direct photolysis. Since it has exhibited variable biodegradability using activated and acclimated sludges and adapted mixed cultures, p-phenylenediamine may undergo biodegradation in environmental waters. It will not be expected to adsorb to sediments but may form covalent bonds with humic materials. ATMOSPHERIC FATE: If p-phenylenediamine (1,4-benzenediamine) is released to the atmosphere it will be subject to direct photolysis and autooxidation. A half-life of 14.14 hrs has been predicted for reaction with photochemically produced hydroxyl radicals . Due to its high water solubility it may be subject to significant rainout.

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