SPECTRUM

Chemical Fact Sheet

Chemical Abstract Number (CAS #) 108601
CASRN 108-60-1
Synonymsbis(2-Chloroisopropyl) ether
Propane, 2,2'-oxybis[1-chloro-
Ether, bis(2-chloro-1-methylethyl)
bis(2-Chloro-1-methylethyl) ether
2,2'-oxybis(1-chloropropane)
DCIP
Analytical Methods EPA Method 611
EPA Method 625
EPA Method 8010
EPA Method 8110
EPA Method 8270
Molecular FormulaC6H12Cl2O

Link to the National Library of Medicine's Hazardous Substances
Database for more details on this compound.

Use HAS BEEN USED AS AN INTERMEDIATE IN MFR OF DYES, RESINS, & PHARMACEUTICALS; USED IN TEXTILE PROCESSES Bis(2-chloro-1-methylethyl)ether is apparently used as a nematocide in Japan, but there is no evidence that the compound is used commercially in the USA. Other uses include: as a combatant in liver fluke infections, in the preparation of glycol esters, in fungicidal preparations, and as an insecticidal wood preservative. Bis(2-chloro-1-methylethyl)ether is not registered in the USA for use as a pesticide. Solvent for fats, greases, extractant, paint and varnish removers, spotting agents and cleaning solutions.
Apparent Color Colorless liquid
Boiling Point 187 DEG C @ 760 MM HG
Melting Point -96.8 TO -101.8 DEG C
Molecular Weight 171.07
Density 1.103 @ 20 DEG C/4 DEG C
Odor Threshold Concentration Odor detection in water= 3.2x10(-1) ppm, chemically pure.
Environmental Impact Bis(2-chloro-1-methylethyl) ether may be released to the environment in waste streams from propylene glycol production. If released to the atmosphere, vapor-phase bis(2-chloro-1-methylethyl) ether is expected to degrade by reaction with photochemically produced hydroxyl radicals (estimated half-life of 1.15 days). Based on its relatively high water solubility, long distance transport in water systems may be significant. If released to soil, bis(2-chloro-1-methylethyl) ether is expected to leach significantly (estimated Koc of 73) into groundwater where it may persist for a long period of time. One river die-away study observed no biodegradation of bis(2-chloro-1-methylethyl) ether; although this study is not specific to soil media, it suggests that biodegradation in soil may be slow. If released to water, volatilization and biodegradation are expected to be the principal removal processes; although these processes may be slow. Volatilization half-lives of 13.9 hr and 6.6 days have been estimated for a model river (one meter deep) and a model environmental pond, respectively. Slow biodegradation may be a significant removal process in water where volatilization is not likely to be important. Hydrolysis, adsorption to sediment and bioconcentration in aquatic organisms are not expected to be environmentally significant removal processes in aquatic systems. Exposure to the general population is expected to occur through consumption of contaminated drinking water. In occupational settings, exposure to bis(2-chloro-1-methylethyl) ether ether may occur through inhalation of vapors and through eye and skin contact.
Environmental Fate AQUATIC FATE: Assuming a first order reduction of concentration the following half-lives were derived: 3-30 days in river water and 30-300 days in lake and groundwater. ATMOSPHERIC FATE: The vapor pressure of bis(2-chloroisopropyl) ether suggests that it might be sufficiently volatile to be transported into the atmosphere. TERRESTRIAL FATE: Bis(2-chloro-1-methylethyl) ether persists in river water after bank and dune infiltration . One biodegradation study observed no biodegradation of bis(2-chloro-1-methylethyl) ether . Although these studies are not specific to soil media, they suggest that biodegradation in soil may not be important. An estimated Koc value of 73 indicates high mobility in soil and significant leaching may occur(2,4,SRC). Based on a reported vapor pressure of 0.85 mmHg at 20 deg C , bis(2-chloro-1-methylethyl) ether may evaporate from dry soil surfaces; however, volatilization from moist soils is not expected to be rapid, but may be important. AQUATIC FATE: Volatilization half-live of 13.9 hr and 6.6 days have been estimated for a model river (one meter deep) and a model environmental pond, respectively(2,3). By analogy to bis(2-chloroethyl)ether (estimated hydrolysis half-life of about 20 yrs at 25 deg C ), hydrolysis of bis(2-chloro-1-methylethyl) ether should be slow and independent of pH. An estimated Koc of 73 and BCF of 9.3 suggest that adsorption to sediment and bioconcentration in aquatic organisms may not be significant(2,SRC); however, bis(2-chloro-1-methylethyl) ether has been identified in sediments(6) and fish(7). Based on one river die-away test and its persistence in infiltrated river and lake water (estimated half-lives of 3.1 and 59 days, respectively, based upon monitoring data(8), slow biodegradation may be a significant removal process in water where volatilization is not likely to be important. ATMOSPHERIC FATE: Based on a reported vapor pressure of 0.85 mm Hg at 20 deg C , bis(2-chloro-1-methylethyl) ether is expected to exists almost entirely in the vapor-phase in the ambient atmosphere(1,SRC). Vapor phase bis(2-chloro-1-methylethyl) ether, is degraded in the ambient atmosphere by reaction with photochemically formed hydroxyl radicals; the half-life for this reaction in air can be estimated to be about 1.15 days(2,SRC).
Drinking Water Impact Bis(2-chloroisopropyl) ether has been detected but not quantified in the Mississippi River, rivers, lakes, and groundwater in the Netherlands and finished drinking water at an unidentified site in NC. Concn in New Orleans drinking water averaged 0.10 ng/cu m. Levels in the drinking water of 9 unnamed cities ranged from 0.02-1.58 ug/l. At the Carrollton station and two sites in Jefferson Parish, LA the finished drinking water /contained 0.018, 0.08, and 0.03 ug/l respectively. A National Organics Monitoring Survey of USA drinking water, bis(2-chloroisopropyl) ether was found in 8 of 113 cities (7-1%) with a mean concn of positives equal to 0.17 ug/l. From table Industrial outfall on the Ohio River ranged from 0.5-35 mg/l. Raw intake of an Evansville, IN water treatment facility had levels of 2.0 ug/l and tap water of 0.8 ug/l Present in finished drinking water of Cincinnati, Ohio and Cleveland, Ohio DRINKING WATER: Bis(2-chloro-1-methylethyl) ether has been identified in tap water from bank filtered Rhine water in the Netherlands at a maximum concn of 3,000 ng/L . Bis(2-chloro-1-methylethyl) ether has been detected in 8 of 113 samples at an average concn of 0.17 ug/L in drinking water from 113 community water supplies from May-June 1976 . Bis(2-chloro-1-methylethyl) ether has been detected in 7 of 110 samples at an average concn of 0.11 ug/L in drinking water from 110 community water supplies from November 1976-January 1977 . It has been identified in municipal drinking water at a concn of 0.8 ug/l in Evansville,IN on August 25, 1971 . Bis(2-chloro-1-methylethyl) ether has been detected in the water supply of Cleveland,OH . Bis(2-chloro-1-methylethyl) ether has been detected at a concn of 0.18 ug/l in finished water from the Carrollton water plant in the New Orleans,LA area . SURFACE WATER: Bis(2-chloro-1-methylethyl) ether has been detected in water at mean concns of 0.10 and 19 ug/L from the New Orleans/Baton Rouge,LA and Houston,TX areas, respectively . Bis(2-chloro-1-methylethyl) ether has been detected in water from the Rhine river in the Netherlands at an average concn of 4 ug/l with a maxima of 15 ug/l during 1978-1979; samples were taken every two weeks . According to the STORET database, bis(2-chloro-1-methylethyl) ether has been detected in ambient water from the U.S.A. at a median concn of <10.000 ug/L . GROUNDWATER: At the Zwolle water utility in the Netherlands, bis(2-chloro-1-methylethyl) ether was detected in 7 observations made in 1978 at a maximum concn of 3 ug/l following bank infiltration of Rhine river water . Three influent water tests from the Rhine river in The Hague showed a concn of approximately 0.5 ug/l, which was not reduced at all after infiltration . EFFL: Release of bis(2-chloro-1-methylethyl)ether in wastewater from industrial processes, particularly in proplylene glycol manufacturing is estimated to be one million lb per yr. Separate figures not given Bis(2-chloro-1-methylethyl) ether has been detected in U.S. rivers as a result of industrial outfall from propylene glycol production(1,2) at concentrations ranging from 0.2-5 ug/L (Ohio River) from August-September 1971 . Bis(2-chloro-1-methylethyl) ether has been detected in water samples from a specially constructed leachate treatment plant located at Love Canal (Niagara Falls, NY) . According to the STORET database, bis(2-chloro-1-methylethyl) ether has been detected in effluents from the U.S.A. with a median concn of <10.000 ug/L .

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