SPECTRUM

Chemical Fact Sheet

Chemical Abstract Number (CAS #) 108941
CASRN 108-94-1
SynonymsCyclohexanone
Analytical Methods EPA Method 554
EPA Method 8315
Molecular FormulaC6H10O

Link to the National Library of Medicine's Hazardous Substances
Database for more details on this compound.

Use SOLVENT FOR CELLULOSE ACETATE, NITROCELLULOSE, WAXES, FAT, VINYL RESINS, CRUDE RUBBER, NATURAL RESINS, SHELLAC, DDT; IN PREPN OF CYCLOHEXANONE RESINS CHEMICAL INT IN SYNTH OF CAPROLACTAM FOR NYLON 6 AND ADIPIC ACID METAL DEGREASING SOLVENT FOR LACQUERS, RESINS AND INSECTICIDES SOLVENT FOR PVC POLYMERS & COPOLYMERS, LACQUERS; SPOT REMOVER AND DEGREASER FOR LEATHER
Consumption Patterns 95% FOR CAPROLACTAM AND ADIPIC ACID; 5% FOR SOLVENT APPLICATIONS (1973) 97% FOR NYLON 6 OR NYLON 66 MFR (1979)
Apparent Color OILY LIQUID ; WATER-WHITE TO PALE YELLOW LIQUID
Odor ODOR REMINISCENT OF PEPPERMINT & ACETONE
Boiling Point 155.6 DEG C @ 760 MM HG; 132.5 DEG C @ 400 MM HG; 110.3 DEG C @ 200 MM HG; 90.4 DEG C @ 100 MM HG; 77.5 DEG C @ 60 MM HG; 67.8 DEG C @ 40 MM HG; 52.5 DEG C @ 20 MM HG; 38.7 DEG C @ 10 MM HG; 26.4 DEG C @ 5 MM HG; 1.4 DEG C @ 1.0 MM HG
Melting Point -16.4 DEG C
Molecular Weight 98.14
Density 0.9421 @ 25 DEG C/4 DEG C; 0.9478 @ 20 DEG C/4 DEG C
Odor Threshold Concentration 0.12 ppm 0.88 ppm; v/v Odor low mg/cu m= 0.4800; Odor high 400 mg/cu m; Irritating Concn= 100 mg/cu m
Sensitivity Data Inhalation of vapor can cause irritation of mucous membranes. Contact of liquid may produce dermatitis in sensitive individuals.
Environmental Impact Cyclohexanone can be released to the environment through air and wastewater emissions involved with its industrial production and production of derivatives such as nylon. Various solvent uses result in direct evaporation into the atmosphere. If released to the atmosphere, cyclohexanone will degrade relatively rapidly by reaction with sunlight produced hydroxyl radicals (half-life of about 1 day) and by direct photolysis (half-life of about 4.3 days). If released to water, cyclohexanone may degrade significantly through biodegradation and photolysis. Volatilization from environmental waters will not be rapid except from rapidly moving, shallow streams. If released to soil, cyclohexanone will be susceptible to significant leaching. Volatilization and photodegradation will occur on soil surfaces. Humans will be primarily exposed to cyclohexanone by inhalation or dermal contact in occupational settings. The general population may be exposed through consumption of contaminated drinking water or inhalation of contaminated air.
Environmental Fate TERRESTRIAL FATE: When released to soil, cyclohexanone can be expected to leach significantly based on a predicted mean Koc value of 10. Its detection in groundwater and in leachate from a waste site indicate that leaching does occur in the environment. Various biological screening studies have found that cyclohexanone is biodegradable in various test systems, including natural water. This suggests that biodegradation in soil is possible. Cyclohexanone on soil surfaces will be susceptible to significant volatilization and photodegradation. AQUATIC FATE: The important environmental fate processes for cyclohexanone in water appear to be biodegradation, photolysis, and volatilization. Various biological screening studies have found that cyclohexanone is biodegradable in various test systems, including natural water. Cyclohexanone photolyzes in ambient air (half-life of about 4.3 days) which suggests that direct photolysis in water is likely to occur; however, the photolysis rate in water will be slower. Volatilization from shallow, rapidly moving streams should be significant (estimated half-life of 3.1 days from a model stream one meter deep); however, volatilization from deeper and less rapidly moving bodies of water such as lakes and ponds will be much slower. Aquatic hydrolysis, bioconcentration, and adsorption to sediment are not important. ATMOSPHERIC FATE: Based on a vapor pressure of 5 mm Hg at 26.4 deg C , cyclohexanone should exist almost entirely in the vapor-phase in the ambient atmosphere(2,SRC). It will degrade relatively rapidly by reaction with sun- light produced hydroxyl radicals (half-life of about 1 day) and by direct photolysis (half-life of about 4.3 days).
Drinking Water Impact DRINKING WATER: Cyclohexanone was qualitatively detected in drinking water from Miami, FL; Ottumwa, IA; Philadelphia, PA; and Cincinnati, OH . Ottumwa, IA tap water contained 0.1 ppb cyclohexanone . Positive identifications in drinking water from Cincinnati, OH (Jan 1980), Miami, FL (Feb 1976), New Orleans, LA (Jan 1976), Ottumwa, IA (Sept 1976), and Seattle, WA (Nov 1976) . GROUND WATER: Maximum concn of 30 ppb detected in ground waters from the Netherlands . Qualitative detection in a ground water aquifer in Australia . SURFACE WATER: Cyclohexanone was qualitatively detected in surface waters within the blast zone of Mount St Helens, WA following the volcanic eruption of May 18, 1980 . Qualitative detection reported for the Rhine River . EFFL: Cyclohexanone detections reported for wastewaters from chemical, latex, and textile manufacturing facilities . Wastewater detections for effluents from advanced treatment facilities in Lake Tahoe(CA), Dallas(TX), and Blue Plains (Washington DC) . A final effluent grab sample from the Danville, IL POTW collected in Jun 1980 contained cyclohexanone . Wastewaters from processing shale oil have been found to contain cyclohexanone(4,5). Cyclohexanone was identified in leachate collected near a municipal landfill in Ontario, Canada(6).

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