SPECTRUM

Chemical Fact Sheet

Chemical Abstract Number (CAS #) 108985
CASRN 108-98-5
SynonymsBenzenethiol
Thiophenol
Mercaptobenzene
Phenyl mercaptan
Molecular FormulaC6H6S

Link to the National Library of Medicine's Hazardous Substances
Database for more details on this compound.

Use CHEM INT FOR CARBOPHENOTHION INSECTICIDE & ACARICIDE, FUNGICIDES, EG, FONOFOS; CHEM INT FOR ITS SODIUM SALT, ALKYL PHENYL SULFIDES, PHARMACEUTICALS, PENTACHLOROTHIOPHENOL & ITS ZINC SALT & INT FOR POLYMERS (EG, WITH FORMALDEHYDE, OTHER PHENOLS). MOSQUITO LARVICIDE.
Apparent Color WATER-WHITE LIQUID; PRISM-LIKE CRYSTALS FROM PETROLEUM ETHER
Odor REPULSIVE, PENETRATING, GARLIC-LIKE
Boiling Point 168.3 DEG C @ 760 MM HG
Melting Point -14.8 DEG C
Molecular Weight 110.17
Density SP GR: 1.0728 @ 25 DEG C/4 DEG C
Odor Threshold Concentration WATER: 0.00028 MG/L; AIR: 0.00094 UL/L; ODOR SAFETY CLASS B; B= 50-90% OF DISTRACTED PERSONS PERCEIVE WARNING OF TLV 0.0012 mg/cu m (odor low) 382.50 mg/cu m (odor high).
Sensitivity Data Skin irritant.
Environmental Impact Thiophenol may be released from sites of its manufacture or use as a pesticide and pharmaceutical intermediate, from petroleum refineries and from use as a mosquito larvicide. If released to soil or water under acidic conditions, thiophenol may react with heavy metals and form insoluble mercaptides. Under neutral and alkaline conditions this type of reaction would not to be an important fate process, since thiophenol should exist predominantly in its ionized form under these conditions. Thiophenol may be moderately mobile in soil under acidic conditions; however, the significance of adsorption under neutral and alkaline conditions is uncertain due to the effects of ionization. Limited data on biodegradation suggest that thiophenol would be susceptible to aerobic biodegradation in soil. Thiophenol is expected to volatilize fairly rapidly from dry soil surfaces. In water, volatilization (half-life 5.8 days from a model river) and aerobic biodegradation are probably important fate processes. Thiophenol may adsorb moderately to suspended solids and sediments in water under acidic conditions; however, the significance of adsorption under neutral and alkaline conditions is uncertain due to the effects of ionization. Direct photolysis, chemical hydrolysis, and bioaccumulation in aquatic organisms are not expected to be important fate processes in water. If released to the atmosphere, thiophenol is expected to exist predominantly in the vapor phase. The dominant removal mechanism appears to be reaction with photochemically generated hydroxyl radicals (half-life 8.8 hours). Direct photolysis is not expected to be an important fate process. Workers involved in the manufacture or use of thiophenol as an intermediate or mosquito larvicide have the potential to be exposed to this compound by dermal contact and/or inhalation.
Environmental Fate TERRESTRIAL FATE: If released to soil under acidic conditions, thiophenol may react with heavy metals and form insoluble mercaptides. Reaction with metals under neutral and alkaline conditions is not expected to be an important fate process, since thiophenol should exist predominantly in its ionized form under these conditions, precluding reaction of the thiol group. Thiophenol may be moderately mobile in soil under acidic conditions; however, the significance of adsorption under neutral and alkaline conditions is uncertain due to the effects of ionization. Chemical hydrolysis is not expected to be an important fate process. The relatively high vapor pressure of thiophenol suggests that this compound would volatilize fairly rapidly from dry soil surfaces. AQUATIC FATE: If released to water under acidic conditions, thiophenol may react with heavy metals and form mercaptides. Reaction with metals under neutral and alkaline conditions is not expected to be an important fate process, since thiophenol should exist predominantly in its ionized form under these conditions, precluding reaction of the thiol group with metals. Volatilization (half-life 5.8 days from a model river) and biodegradation are probably important fate processes. Thiophenol may adsorb moderately to suspended solids and sediments under acidic conditons; however, the significance of adsorption under neutral and alkaline conditions is uncertain due to the effects of ionization. Direct photolysis, chemical hydrolysis, and bioaccumulation in aquatic organisms are not expected to be important fate processes. ATMOSPHERIC FATE Based on a vapor pressure of 2mm Hg at 25 deg C , thiophenol is expected to exist predominantly in the vapor phase in the atmosphere(2,SRC). The dominant removal mechanism appears to be reaction with photochemically generated hydroxy radicals (half-life 8.8 hours(3,SRC). Direct photolysis is not expected to be an important fate process. EFFL: Benzenethiol has been identified in the effluent from a petroleum refining industry .

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