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Chemical Fact Sheet

Chemical Abstract Number (CAS #) 109604
CASRN 109-60-4
Synonymsn-Propyl acetate
Acetic acid, propyl ester
1-Acetoxypropane
Molecular FormulaC5H10O2

Link to the National Library of Medicine's Hazardous Substances
Database for more details on this compound.

Use SOLVENT FOR PLASTICS CHEM INT FOR FLAVORS, PERFUMES, MISCELLANEOUS ORGANIC SYNTHESES; LAB REAGENT; SOLVENT FOR NITROCELLULOSE & OTHER CELLULOSE DERIVATIVES, LACQUERS, NATURAL & SYNTHETIC RESINS Solvent for nitrocellulose-based flexographic inks n-Propy acetate is a powerful solvent and is used in nitrocellulose lacquers, waxes, and insecticide formulations. Used in alcohol-dilutable inks containing nitrocellulose as a main constituent, polyamide inks, acrylic inks.
Apparent Color COLORLESS LIQUID
Boiling Point 101.6 DEG C @ 760 MM HG
Melting Point -92 DEG C
Molecular Weight 102.15
Density 0.836 @ 20 DEG C/4 DEG C
Odor Threshold Concentration 0.21 mg/cu m (odor low); 105.00 mg/cu m (odor high).
Sensitivity Data IN MAN, CONCN OF 200 PPM CAUSE IRRITATION OF EYES & GREATER CONCN CAUSE IRRITATION OF NOSE & LARYNX.
Environmental Impact n-Propyl acetate, which is used as a solvent, may be released in fugitive emissions during its manufacture, formulation, or use in commercial products. n-Propyl acetate is also a naturally occurring compound. If released to soil, n-propyl acetate will display very high mobility and it has the potential to leach into groundwater. Rapid volatilization is expected to occur from both moist and dry soils. Hydrolysis of n-propyl acetate in soil is not expected to be a significant process except in highly basic soils with a pH >9. If released to water, n-propyl acetate is expected to rapidly volatilize to the atmosphere. The half-life for volatilization from a model river is 6.5 h. Limited data suggest that n-propyl acetate will biodegrade in aquatic systems under aerobic conditions. n-Propyl acetate will not significantly adsorb to sediment and suspended organic matter, nor will it bioconcentrate in fish and aquatic organisms. Hydrolysis of n-propyl acetate in aquatic systems is not expected to be a significant process except under basic conditions of pH >9. In the atmosphere, n-propyl acetate is expected to undergo a relatively slow gas-phase reaction with photochemically produced hydroxyl radicals with experimental half-lives on the order of 4-5 days. n-Propyl acetate may undergo atmospheric removal by wet deposition. The probable routes of exposure to n-propyl acetate are by inhalation and dermal contact during the production and use of this compound. The general public is likely to be exposed to n-propyl acetate by the ingestion of foods in which it is contained.
Environmental Fate TERRESTRIAL FATE: If released to soil, calculated soil adsorption coefficients ranging from approximately 19 to 111(1,SRC) (obtained from its water solubility and log octanol water partition coefficient , respectively), suggests that n-propyl acetate will display high to very high mobility in soil and has the potential to leach into groundwater. The Henry's Law constant of n-propyl acetate, 2.18X10-4 atm cu-m/mole at 20 deg C , and its vapor pressure, 33.7 mm Hg at 25 deg C(6), suggest that this compound will rapidly volatilize from both moist and dry soil. Hydrolysis of n-propyl acetate in soil is not expected to be a significant process except in highly basic soils with a pH >9, as hydrolysis rate constants indicate that this process will be too slow to be environmentally significant under acidic, neutral, and slightly basic conditions(7,8,SRC). AQUATIC FATE: If released to water, n-propyl acetate is expected to rapidly volatilize to the atmosphere. Based on a measured Henry's Law constant, 2.18X10-4 atm cu-m/mole at 25 deg C , the half-life for volatilization from a model river is 6.5 h(2,SRC). The available data indicate that n-propyl acetate will biodegrade in aquatic systems under aerobic conditions(3,4). From its water solubility and log octanol water partition coefficient(6), calculated soil adsorption coefficients ranging from 19.4 to 111(2,SRC) and calculated bioconcentration factors ranging 2.5 to 5.1(2,SRC), respectively, indicate that n-propyl acetate will not significantly adsorb to sediment and suspended organic matter, nor will it bioconcentrate in fish and aquatic organisms. Hydrolysis of n-propyl acetate in aquatic systems is not expected to be a significant process except under basic conditions of pH >9, as hydrolysis rate constants indicate that this process will be too slow to be environmentally significant under acidic, neutral, and slightly basic conditions(7,8,SRC). ATMOSPHERIC FATE: Experimental rate constants for the gas phase reaction of n-propyl acetate with photochemically produced hydroxyl radicals in the range 2.4-4.1X10-12 cu-cm/mol-sec(1-6) correspond to an atmospheric half-life ranging 3.39-6.69 days. The relatively high water solubility of n-propyl acetate, 1.89X10 4 mg/L at 25 deg C(7), suggests that this compound may be removed from the atmosphere by wet deposition.
Drinking Water Impact SURFACE WATER: n-Propyl acetate was detected, but not quantified, in water samples taken from the River, Lee, in the U.K., date not given . EFFL: n-Propyl acetate was detected as gaseous emission from the production of RDX at the Holston Army Ammunition Plant, TN, date not provided, at an emission rate of 1,134 lbs/day .

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