SPECTRUM

Chemical Fact Sheet

Chemical Abstract Number (CAS #) 111762
CASRN 111-76-2
Synonyms2-n-Butoxyethanol
Molecular FormulaC6H14O2

Link to the National Library of Medicine's Hazardous Substances
Database for more details on this compound.

Use IN HYDRAULIC FLUIDS SOLVENT FOR PROTECTIVE COATINGS & METAL CLEANERS; LIQUID HOUSEHOLD CLEANERS; CHEMICAL INTERMEDIATE IN SYNTH OF DI(2-BUTOXYETHYL) PHTHALATE & 2-BUTOXYETHYL ACETATE The preferred coupling agent for many water-based coatings. Used to make acetate esters as well as phthalate and stearate plasticizers. A coupling agent to stabilize immiscible ingredients in metal cleaners, textile lubricants, cutting oils and liquid household products. Solvent for nitrocellulose resins, spray lacquers, quick-drying lacquers varnishes, enamels, drycleaning cmpd, varnish removers, textile (preventing spotting in printing or dyeing), mutual solvent for "soluble" mineral oils to hold soap in solution and to improve the emulsifying properties.
Consumption Patterns 41% AS SOLVENT FOR PROTECTIVE COATINGS; 18% AS SOLVENT FOR METAL CLEANERS AND LIQUID HOUSEHOLD CLEANERS; 9% FOR SYNTHESIS OF 2-BUTOXYETHYL ACETATE; 1% FOR SYNTHESIS OF DI(2-BUTOXYETHYL) PHTHALATE; 31% FOR OTHER SOLVENT USES (1972) Intermediates, 20%; Coatings solvent, 65%; Miscellaneous solvents, 15% (1983)
Apparent Color Colorless liquid
Odor MILD ODOR
Boiling Point 171-172 DEG C
Melting Point -70 deg C
Molecular Weight 118.20
Density SP GR: 0.9012 @ 20 DEG C/4 DEG C
Sensitivity Data Irritation of eyes, nose and throat
Environmental Impact Ethylene glycol mono-n-butyl ether may be released to the environment via effluents at sites where it is produced or used as a solvent. Solvent based building materials such as silicone caulk may release ethylene glycol mono-n-butyl ether to air as they dry. Leachate from municipal landfills and hazardous waste sites can also release ethylene glycol mono-n-butyl ether to groundwaters. Ethylene glycol mono-n-butyl ether is not expected to undergo hydrolysis or direct photolysis in the environment. The complete miscibility of ethylene glycol mono-n-butyl ether in water suggests that volatilization, adsorption and bioconcentration are not important fate processes. This is supported by an estimated Henry's Law constant of 2.08X10-8 atm-cu m/mole at 25 deg C which indicates that volatilization of ethylene glycol mono-n-butyl ether from environmental waters and moist soil should be extremely slow. A low estimated log BCF suggests ethylene glycol mono-n-butyl ether should not bioconcentrate among aquatic organisms. A low Koc indicates ethylene glycol mono-n-butyl ether should not partition from the water column to organic matter contained in sediments and suspended solids, and it should be highly mobile in soil. Limited monitoring data has shown it can leach to ground water. Aqueous screening test data indicate that biodegradation is likely to be the most important removal mechanism of ethylene glycol mono-n-butyl ether from aerobic soil and water. In the atmosphere, ethylene glycol mono-n-butyl ether is expected to exist almost entirely in the vapor phase and reactions with photochemically produced hydroxyl radicals should be important (estimated half-life of 17 hrs). Physical removal of ethylene glycol mono-n-butyl ether from air by precipitation and dissolution in clouds may occur; however, its short atmospheric residence time suggests that wet deposition is of limited importance. The most probable human exposure would be occupational exposure, which may occur through dermal contact or inhalation at workplaces where it is produced or used. Workplace exposures have been documented. Limited monitoring data indicate that non-occupational exposures can occur from the ingestion of contaminated drinking water supplies. Human exposures may also occur at construction sites and areas that have undergone remodelling.
Environmental Fate TERRESTRIAL FATE: Alcohols and ethers are generally resistant to hydrolysis . They do not absorb UV light in the environmentally significant range, (>290 nm), and are commonly used as solvents for obtaining UV spectra(12). Therefore, ethylene glycol mono-n-butyl ether should not undergo hydrolysis in moist terrestrial environments, or direct photolysis on sunlit soil surfaces. An estimated Henry's Law constant of 2.08X10-8 atm-cu m/mole at 25 deg C indicates that volatilization of ethylene glycol mono-n-butyl ether from moist soil should not be an important fate process . An estimated Koc of 67 indicates ethylene glycol mono-n-butyl ether should be highly mobile in soil ; and limited monitoring data has shown it may leach to ground water(4-6). Aqueous screening test data(7-11) suggest that biodegradation is likely to be the most important removal mechanism of ethylene glycol mono-n-butyl ether from aerobic soil. AQUATIC FATE: Alcohols and ethers are generally resistant to hydrolysis . They do not absorb UV light in the environmentally significant range, >290 nm and are commonly used as solvents for obtaining UV spectra . Therefore, ethylene glycol mono-n-butyl ether should not undergo hydrolysis or direct photolysis in aquatic environments. The complete miscibility of ethylene glycol mono-n-butyl ether in water suggests that volatilization, adsorption and bioconcentration are not important fate processes. This is supported by an estimated Henry's Law constant of 2.08X10-8 atm-cu m/mole at 25 deg C which indicates that volatilization of ethylene glycol mono-n-butyl ether from natural waters should be extremely slow . AQUATIC FATE: An estimated Koc of 67 indicates ethylene glycol mono-n-butyl ether should not partition from the water column to organic matter contained in sediments and suspended solids. An estimated bioconcentration factor (log BCF) of 0.40 indicates ethylene glycol mono-n-butyl ether should not bioconcentrate among aquatic organisms. Aqueous screening test data(2-6) suggest that aerobic biodegradation is likely to be the most important removal mechanism of ethylene glycol mono-n-butyl ether from aquatic systems. ATMOSPHERIC FATE: Alcohols and ethers do not absorb UV light in the environmentally significant range (>290 nm), and are commonly used as solvents for obtaining UV spectra . Therefore, ethylene glycol mono-n-butyl ether should not undergo direct photolysis in the atmosphere. Based on a vapor pressure of 8.8X10-1 mm Hg at 25 deg C , ethylene glycol mono-n-butyl ether is expected to exist almost entirely in the vapor phase in ambient air where vapor phase reactions with photochemically produced hydroxyl radicals may be important. The rate constant for ethylene glycol mono-n-butyl ether has been estimated to be 2.30X10-11 cu cm/molecule-sec at 25 deg C, which corresponds to an atmospheric half-life of about 17 hrs at an atmospheric concn of 5X10 5 hydroxyl radicals per cu cm . The complete miscibility of ethylene glycol mono-n-butyl ether in water indicates that physical removal from air by precipitation and dissolution in clouds may occur; however, its short atmospheric residence time suggests that wet deposition is of limited importance.
Drinking Water Impact DRINKING WATER: Ethylene glycol mono-n-butyl ether was listed as a contaminant found in drinking water for a survey of US cities including Pomona, Escondido, Lake Tahoe and Orange Co, CA and Dallas, Washington, DC, Cincinnati, Philadelphia, Miami, New Orleans, Ottumwa, IA, and Seattle . GROUNDWATER: Ethylene glycol mono-n-butyl ether was detected at a concn of 23 ug/L in 1 of 7 groundwater samples collected near "The Valley of Drums", KY . A ground water sample from an aquifer underlying a municipal landfill in Norman, OK contained ethylene glycol mono-n-butyl ether(2,3). SURFACE WATER: In April 1980, ethylene glycol mono-n-butyl ether was detected in Hayashida River water (the Matsubara area in Tatsuno City, Hyogo Prefecture) at concn of 1310 and 5680 ppb . EFFL: Dunlap WJ et al; Organic Pollutants Contributed to Groundwater by a Landfill USEPA-600/9-76-004 p. 96-110 (1976) Dunlap WJ et al; Identif Anal Org Pollut 1: 453-77 (1976) Tichenor BA, Mason MA; JAPCA 38: 264-8 (1988) Perry DL et al; Iden of Org Compounds in Ind Effluent Discharges USEPA-600/4-79-016 (NTIS PB-294794) p. 230 (1979)] Ethylene glycol mono-n-butyl ether was identified in 1 and 4 neutral fractions of 33 industrial wastewater effluents at concn of <10 and <100 ug/L, respectively . Because ethylene glycol mono-n-butyl ether was detected in groundwater receiving municipal landfill leachate it may be present in other landfill leachates(2,3). Ethylene glycol mono-n-butyl ether was listed as a volatile organic emission of silicone caulk .

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