SPECTRUM

Chemical Fact Sheet

Chemical Abstract Number (CAS #) 111900
CASRN 111-90-0
Synonyms2-(2-Ethoxyethoxy)ethanol
Molecular FormulaC6H14O3

Link to the National Library of Medicine's Hazardous Substances
Database for more details on this compound.

Use FUNCTIONAL FLUID AS SOLVENT FOR CELLULOSE ESTERS, IN LACQUER & THINNER FORMULATIONS; IN QUICK DRYING VARNISHES AND ENAMELS, FOR DYESTUFFS AND WOOD STAINS. MUTUAL SOLVENT IN MANY OIL-WATER COMPOSITIONS; CHEM INTERMEDIATE; SOLVENT FOR VARIOUS RESINS, INKS, PRINTING PASTES, CLEANING COMPOSITIONS A DILUENT FOR HYDRAULIC BRAKE FLUIDS; SOLVENT IN PROTECTIVE COATINGS, TEXTILE DYEING & PRINTING; SOLVENT IN COSMETICS, TOILETRIES
Consumption Patterns 23% CONSUMED AS A DILUENT FOR HYDRAULIC BRAKE FLUIDS; 77% CONSUMED IN OTHER APPLICATIONS INCLUDING USE AS A SOLVENT IN PROTECTIVE COATINGS, TEXTILE PRINTING & DYEING, AND IN COSMETICS & TOILETRIES (1972)
Apparent Color COLORLESS LIQUID
Odor VERY PLEASANT
Boiling Point 196 DEG C
Molecular Weight 134.17
Density SP GR: 0.9855 @ 25 DEG C/4 DEG C
Sensitivity Data The liquid is moderately irritating to the eye
Environmental Impact Diethylene glycol monoethyl ether may be released to the environment via a wide variety of effluents at sites where it is produced or used as a solvent. Diethylene glycol monoethyl ether is not expected to undergo hydrolysis or direct photolysis in the environment. The complete miscibility of diethylene glycol monoethyl ether in water suggests that volatilization, adsorption and bioconcentration are not important fate processes. This is supported by an estimated Henry's Law constant of 8.63X10-10 atm-cu m/mole at 25 deg C which indicates that volatilization of diethylene glycol monoethyl ether from natural waters and moist soil should be extremely slow. A low estimated log BCF suggests diethylene glycol monoethyl ether should not bioconcentrate among aquatic organisms. A low Koc indicates diethylene glycol monoethyl ether should not partition from the water column to organic matter contained in sediments and suspended solids, and it should be highly mobile in soil. Aqueous screening test data indicate that biodegradation is likely to be the most important removal mechanism of diethylene glycol monoethyl ether from aerobic soil and water. In the atmosphere, diethylene glycol monoethyl ether is expected to exist almost entirely in the vapor phase and reactions with photochemically produced hydroxyl radicals should be important (estimated half-life of 13 hrs). Physical removal of diethylene glycol monoethyl ether from air by precipitation and dissolution in clouds may occur; however, its short atmospheric residence time suggests that wet deposition is of limited importance. The most probable human exposure would be occupational exposure, which may occur through dermal contact or inhalation at workplaces where it is produced or used. Atmospheric workplace exposures have been documented. Limited monitoring data indicates that non-occupational exposures can occur from the ingestion of contaminated drinking water supplies.
Environmental Fate TERRESTRIAL FATE: Alcohols and ethers are generally resistant to hydrolysis . They do not absorb UV light in the environmentally significant range (>290 nm) and are commonly used as solvents for obtaining UV spectra(9). Therefore, diethylene glycol monoethyl ether should not undergo hydrolysis in moist terrestrial environments, or direct photolysis on sunlit soil surfaces. An estimated Henry's Law constant of 8.63X10-10 atm-cu m/mole at 25 deg C indicates that volatilization of diethylene glycol monoethyl ether from moist soil should not be an important fate process . An estimated Koc of 20 indicates diethylene glycol monoethyl ether should be highly mobile in soil . Aqueous screening test data(4-8) indicate that biodegradation is likely to be the most important removal mechanism of diethylene glycol monoethyl ether from aerobic soil. AQUATIC FATE: Alcohols and ethers are generally resistant to hydrolysis . They do not absorb UV light in the environmentally significant range (>290 nm) and are commonly used as solvents for obtaining UV spectra(9). Therefore, diethylene glycol monoethyl ether should not undergo hydrolysis or direct photolysis in aquatic environments. The complete miscibility of diethylene glycol monoethyl ether in water suggests that volatilization, adsorption and bioconcentration are not important fate processes. This is supported by an estimated Henry's Law constant of 8.63X10-10 atm-cu m/mole at 25 deg C which indicates that volatilization of diethylene glycol monoethyl ether from natural waters should be extremely slow . An estimated Koc of 20 indicates diethylene glycol monoethyl ether should not partition from the water column to organic matter contained in sediments and suspended solids; and an estimated bioconcentration factor (log BCF) of -0.34 indicates diethylene glycol monoethyl ether should not bioconcentrate among aquatic organisms. Aerobic screening test(4-8) data indicate that rapid aerobic biodegradation is likely to be the most important removal mechanism of diethylene glycol monoethyl ether from aquatic systems. ATMOSPHERIC FATE: Alcohols and ethers do not absorb UV light in the environmentally significant range (>290 nm) and are commonly used as solvents for obtaining UV spectra . Therefore, diethylene glycol monoethyl ether should not undergo direct photolysis in the atmosphere. Based on a vapor pressure of 1.26X10-1 mm Hg at 25 deg C , diethylene glycol mono-n-ethyl ether is expected to exist almost entirely in the vapor phase in ambient air where vapor phase reactions with photochemically produced hydroxyl radicals should be important. The rate constant for diethylene glycol monoethyl ether has been estimated to be 2.93X10-11 cu cm/molecule-sec at 25 deg C, which corresponds to an atmospheric half-life of about 13 hrs at an atmospheric concn of 5X10 5 hydroxyl radicals per cu cm . The complete miscibility of diethylene glycol monoethyl ether in water indicates that physical removal from air by precipitation and dissolution in clouds may occur; however, its short atmospheric residence time suggests that wet deposition is of limited importance.
Drinking Water Impact DRINKING WATER: Diethylene glycol monoethyl ether was listed as a contaminant found in drinking water for a survey of US cities including Pomona, Escondido, Lake Tahoe and Orange Co, CA and Dallas, Washington, DC, Cincinnati, Philadelphia, Miami, New Orleans, Ottumwa, IA, and Seattle . EFFL: For a national survey, diethylene glycol monoethyl ether was detected in 5 of 21 industrial categories of wastewater effluents . Wastewater from the iron and steel industry contained diethylene glycol monoethyl ether at an average concn of 497 mg/l; 52,189 mg/l for printing and publishing; 175 mg/l for amusement and athletic goods; and 40 mg/l for pulp and paper; other categories included public owned treatment works .

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