SPECTRUM

Chemical Fact Sheet

Chemical Abstract Number (CAS #) 115322
CASRN 115-32-2
Synonymsp,p'-Dicofol
Benzenemethanol, 4-chloro-alpha-(4-chlorophenyl)-alpha-(trichloromethyl)-
Kelthane
Dicofol
DTMC
Acarin
Analytical Methods EPA Method 617
EPA Method 8081
Molecular FormulaC14H9Cl5O

Link to the National Library of Medicine's Hazardous Substances
Database for more details on this compound.

Use Control of many species of mite on a wide range of crops, incl fruit, vines, ornamentals, vegetables, & field crops /Used in or around agricultural and domestic buildings for mite control.
Consumption Patterns On cotton, 50%; on citrus, 29%; deciduous fruits/nuts, 13%; ornamentals, 4%; and in home and garden applications, 4%, estimated (1978) ACARICIDE FOR COTTON, 75%; ACARICIDE FOR CITRUS, 17%; ACARICIDE FOR VEGETABLES, 8% (1982)
Apparent Color COLORLESS SOLID Waxy solid ; Non-flowable liquid (or waxy solid), ranging from dark to yellow brown in color.
Odor Solids have slight characteristic odor ; Liquid has odor of the solvent (xylene)
Boiling Point 180 deg C @ 0.1 mm Hg
Melting Point 77-78 DEG C
Molecular Weight 370.47
Density 1.130 @ 20 deg C
Sensitivity Data Probable severe eye irritant. Dust is irritating to nose & throat. Liq or solid is irritating to skin & eyes.
Environmental Impact Dicofol is released to the environment through its manufacture and use as a nonsystemic acaricide. If released to soil, it will be expected to bind to the soil strongly but under some circumstances it may reach groundwater, since it has been detected in groundwater. It is susceptible to hydrolysis in moist soils and evaporation from the surface of moist soils. It may be resistant to biodegradation. If it is released to water it will be expected to bind to the sediments and may bioconcentrate in aquatic organisms. It will be subject to hydrolysis and may directly photodegrade. It may be resistant to biodegradation but may be susceptible to evaporation. If it is released to the atmosphere it may be subject to direct photolysis. The estimated vapor phase half-life in the atmosphere is 2.92 days as a result of reaction with photochemically produced hydroxyl radicals. General exposure to dicofol occurs when kelthane is used and will occur mainly through consumption of contaminated foods. Dermal, ingestive, and inhalation exposure may also occur as a result of its manufacture and use as a non-systemic acaricide.
Environmental Fate TERRESTRIAL FATE: If released to soils dicofol will be expected to bind to the soil based on estimated Koc values and would therefore not be expected to leach extensively to the groundwater; however, dicofol's reported presence in groundwater samples illustrates that transport through the soil by some mechanism is possible. It may be susceptible to hydrolysis in moist soils since it is suceptible to hydrolysis to dichlorobenzophenone in river water. No information is available concerning the biodegradation of dicofol in soils or its evaporation from the surface of soils. Dicofol may be resistant to biodegradation and susceptible to evaporation from moist soils although adsorption to the soil may retard these processes. AQUATIC FATE: If dicofol is released to water it will be expected to adsorb to the sediment based on estimated Koc values. It may bioconcentrate in aquatic organisms based on the little experimental data available; this is in contrast to the estimated BCF values, that suggest that it will not bioconcentrate. It will be subject to hydrolysis and may directly photodegrade. Although no data were located concerning the biodegradation or evaporation of dicofol, the behavior of structurally similar chemicals, such as DDT, suggests that dicofol may be resistant to biodegradation and susceptible to evaporation in water. ATMOSPHERIC FATE: If dicofol is released to the atmosphere it may be subject to direct photolysis since it absorbs light > 290 nm. TERRESTRIAL FATE: ALTHOUGH RESIDUES IN SOIL DECREASE RAPIDLY, TRACES MAY REMAIN MORE THAN A YEAR.
Drinking Water Impact DRINKING WATER: Dicofol was identified (not quantified) in well water of selected California communities . Dicofol was detected in 3 of 38 county water supplies in CA . GROUNDWATER: Dicofol was detected in groundwater wells from the Miami Drum Services site, Dade County, FL, 1982, 7 wells, 86% pos, depth 2.4-23 meters, 0.2-1.8 ppb . SURFACE WATER: Dicofol was reported to be absent from the Lake Huron basin ecosystem . EFFL: Up to 0.397 mg/l of dicofol has been detected in industrial wastewater in the USSR.

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