SPECTRUM

Chemical Fact Sheet

Chemical Abstract Number (CAS #) 13194484
CASRN 13194-48-4
SynonymsEthoprophos
Ethoprop
O-Ethyl S,S-dipropylphosphorodithioate
Mocap
Phosphorodithioic acid, O-ethyl S,S-dipropyl ester
Analytical Method EPA Method 8141
Molecular FormulaC8H19O2PS2

Link to the National Library of Medicine's Hazardous Substances
Database for more details on this compound.

Use SRP: FORMER USE WIREWORM AND FLEABEETLE LARVAE CONTROL. IT IS RECOMMENDED FOR CORN ROOTWORM, CUTWORM & WIREWORM CONTROL ON CORN; WIREWORM CONTROL ON WHITE POTATO; & CORN ROOTWORM CONTROL ON PEANUTS AT PEGGING AND ROOT BORER CONTROL ON BANANA AND PLAINTAIN. Control of plant-parasitic nematodes and soil insects in ornamentals, potatoes, sweet potatoes, tomatoes, vegetables, soya beans, groundnuts, cucurbits, strawberries, citrus, tobacco, pineapples, sugar cane, turf, and other crops. Nematicide, soil insecticide for bananas, beans (snap, lima), cabbage, corn,cucumber, flue-cured tobacco, peanuts, plantains, Bermuda, Zoysia, St. Augustine, centipede, Fescue, Kentucky Blue, perennial rye, Bahia grasses in commercial turf. It is a non-systemic, non-fumigant nematicide, which is also effective against soil-dwelling insects and used at 1.6-6.6 kg ai/hectare.
Consumption Patterns 55% AS AN INSECTICIDE & NEMATOCIDE ON CORN, PEANUTS, SUGARCANE, SWEET POTATOES, & SEEDLINGS; 45% AS AN INSECTICIDE & NEMATOCIDE ON TOBACCO (1974)
Apparent Color CLEAR, PALE YELLOW LIQUID
Boiling Point 86-91 DEG C @ 0.2 MM HG
Melting Point 20 deg C
Molecular Weight 242.36
Density 1.094 @ 20 DEG C/4 DEG C
Environmental Impact Ethoprop's use as a non-systemic nematicide releases the compound directly to the environment through applications in sprays, granules and other routes of application. If released to the atmosphere, ethoprop will degrade rapidly in thevapor phase by reaction with photochemically produced hydroxyl radicals (half-life of about 5.7 hr). When released to soil and water, ethoprop will degrade primarily through biodegradation. Screening studies have indicated that biodegradation is the major degradation process in soil. Aqueous hydrolysis may become an important process in alkaline water and soils; hydrolysis is not important at pH 7 or less, but it is reported to become rapid at pH 9 and above. Adsorption studies have shown that ethoprop is moderately to highly mobile in soil. The US Dept of Agric's Pesticide Properties Database lists a soil half-life of 25 days for ethoprop, but it may range from 3-56 days. Due to microbial adaptation, ethoprop degrades more rapidly in soils that have had prior exposure to ethoprop. Occupational exposure occurs through dermal contact and inhalation of sprays, especially to workers applying the compound as an insecticide and nematicide. Since ethoprop has been detected in U.S. foods (especially plants and vegetables) exposure to the general population may occur through consumption of foods containing ethoprop residues.
Environmental Fate TERRESTRIAL FATE: Screening studies have indicated that biodegradation is the major degradation process in soil(1-2). Aqueous hydrolysis may become an important process in moist alkaline soils; hydrolysis is not important at pH 7 or less(1,3), but it is reported to become rapid at pH 9 and above(1,3). Adsorption studies have shown that ethoprop is moderately to highly mobile in soil(4,6,SRC). Its high mobility in sandy soil has a potential for contaminating ground water in areas with high water tables(7). Volatilization from soil (from the upper 10 cm) may contribute to ethoprop's disappearance from soil(8,SRC). The US Dept of Agric's Pesticide Properties Database lists a soil half-life of 25 days for ethoprop ,but it may range from 3-56 days(7). Due to microbial adaptation, ethoprop degrades more rapidly in soils that have had prior exposure to ethoprop(2,9). TERRESTRIAL FATE: The soil half-life of ethoprop can range from 3 to 56 days . Soil from ethoprop treated plots in themidwestern US were studied to determine ethoprop persistence ; half-lives of 5-12 days were observed at application rates of 1-2 lb/acre granular formulation ; when applied as a liquid formulation to VA soil, half-lives of 3-4 days were observed . In various field studies, soil half-lives of 2-12 weeks were determined . In soil column studies, ethoprop had the following half-lives : in silty loam (12 days at 20 deg C to 89 days at 2 deg C), in sandy loam (16 days at 20 deg C to 144 days at 2 deg C), in humous loamy sand (73 days at 20 deg C to 347 days at 6 deg C) . Mineralization of ethoprop was found to occur faster in soils that had been treated previously with ethoprop as compared to no prior treatment ; during a 1 week incubation, 32.7% mineralized in previously treated soil and 19.9% mineralized in untreated soil . AQUATIC FATE: Since biodegradation has been shown to be the major degradation process in soil(1-2), biodegradation is probably the major degradation process in water. Aqueous hydrolysis may become an important process in alkaline water; hydrolysis is not important at pH 7 or less(1,3), but it is reported to become rapid at pH 9 and above(1,3); hydrolysis rates at pH 8 are not available. Aquatic volatilization, bioconcentration and adsorption to sediment are not expected to be important fate processes. ATMOSPHERIC FATE: Based upon a reported vapor pressure of 3.8X10-4 mm Hg at 20-25 deg C , ethoprop can exist in both the vapor and particulate phases in the ambient atmosphere, although the vapor phase will be dominant(2,SRC). It will degrade rapidly in the vapor phase by reaction with photochemically produced hydroxyl radicals with an estimated half-life of about 5.7 hr(3,SRC). Particulate phase ethoprop and aerosols released to air during applications of ethoprop nematicides will be removed from air physically by dry and wet deposition.
Drinking Water Impact DRINKING WATER: In July 1986, 33 treated public water sources were analyzed for mocap following a rainstorm ; ethoprop was not detected (detection limit 0.1 ug/L) in any of 33 waters . SURFACE WATER: Ethoprop has been qualitatively detected in the Cuyahoga River, Sandusky River, Maumee River and Raison River of the Lake Erie ecosystem . GROUNDWATER: According to an interim report of the USEPA's Groundwater Data Base, ethoprop has been detected in groundwaters from NY at a max concn of 12.6 ppb . RAINWATER: In a pesticide monitoring program conducted at three sites in IA between Oct 1987 and Sept 1990 to identify pesticide concns in rainwater, ethoprop was not detected (detection limit 0.1 ug/l) in any of 318 rainwater samples . EFFL: Approximately 0.01 to 0.1% of liquid and granular ethoprop applied to a sandy loam soil in a small watershed was detected in runoff water after application .

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