SPECTRUM

Chemical Fact Sheet

Chemical Abstract Number (CAS #) 134327
CASRN 134-32-7
Synonymsalpha-Naphthylamine
1-Naphthylamine
Analytical Methods EPA Method 625
EPA Method 8270
Molecular FormulaC10H9N

Link to the National Library of Medicine's Hazardous Substances
Database for more details on this compound.

Use TONING PRINTS MADE WITH CERIUM SALTS. CHEM INT FOR DYES, EG, AZOIC DIAZO COMPONENT; CHEM INT FOR AZO DYE COUPLING AGENTS, FOR N-1-NAPHTHYLPHTHALMIC ACID HERBICIDE, FOR N-PHENYL-1-NAPHTHYLAMINE RUBBER ANTIOXIDANT, FOR AN IMIDAZOLINE ADRENERGIC AGENT; CHEM INT FOR 1-NAPHTHYLTHIOUREA RODENTICIDE & FOR A FLUOROACETAMIDE MITICIDE (FORMER USES).
Apparent Color NEEDLES FROM DIL ETHANOL AND ETHER ; YELLOW RHOMBIC NEEDLES ; WHITE CRYSTALS ; NEEDLES, BECOME RED ON EXPOSURE TO AIR OR A REDDISH, CRYSTALLINE MASS
Odor WEAK AMMONIA-LIKE ODOR
Boiling Point 300.8 DEG C @ 760 MM HG
Melting Point 50 DEG C
Molecular Weight 143.18
Density SP GR: 1.1229 @ 25 DEG C/25 DEG C
Sensitivity Data Eye: immediately irritating.
Environmental Impact 1-Naphthylamine may be released to the environment in waste streams and effluents from coal tar, coal gasification and shale oil facilities, in effluents from its use in the synthesis of dyes and herbicides, by the degradation of the herbicide naptalam, and by the combustion of fuels containing a high nitrogen content. If released to soil, microbial metabolism is expected to be the primary mechanism for the degradation of 1-naphthylamine. Adsorption of 1-naphthylamine in soil involves a rapid and reversible equilibrium followed by a slow reaction of covalent binding to the humic fraction of soil which is not readily reversible. Experimental Koc values of 2688-3777 have been determined which indicate only slight mobility in soil, however, the detection of 1-naphthylamine in a groundwater indicates that leaching is possible. The soil half-life of 1-naphthylamine was found to be in excess of one year in laboratory studies; the covalent binding may explain why it resists decomposition in soil. If released to water, 1-naphthylamine will react with photochemically produced RO2 radicals with an estimated half-life of 115 hours in sunlit natural water. Reaction with hydroxyl radicals and direct photolysis may also contribute to its removal in sunlit natural water. 1-Naphthylamine may covalently bind to humic material in water; its detection in river sediment indicates that some adsorption does occur. Adsorption to aquatic humic material may lessen the removal rate due to photochemical mechanisms and significantly lengthen the persistence time. Hydrolysis, volatilization and bioconcentration are not expected to be important in water. If released to the atmosphere, 1-naphthylamine will react in the vapor-phase with photochemically produced hydroxyl radicals at an estimated half-life of 12.7 hours. Since 1-naphthylamine strongly absorbs UV light above 290 nm, direct photolysis is possible. Occupational exposure may occur through dermal and inhalation routes while general population exposure may occur through inhalation of mainstream cigarette smoke.
Environmental Fate TERRESTRIAL FATE: Laboratory studies have indicated that microbial metabolism is the primary mechanism for the degradation of 1-naphthylamine in soil, although the soil half-life for 1-naphthylamine in these studies was in excess of one year . Adsorption in soil initially involves a rapid and reversible equilibrium followed by a slow reaction of covalent binding to the humic fraction of soil. Covalent binding of aromatic amines to soil humic matter, which represents a conversion of the amine to a latent form, is not readily reversible ; the covalent binding may explain why 1-naphthylamine resists decomposition in soil . Experimental Koc values of 2688-3777 have been determined which indicate only slight mobility in soil while estimation equations predict high soil mobility; the difference may be explained by the covalent binding. The detection of 1-naphthylamine in a groundwater indicates that leaching is possible. Since 1-naphtylamine strongly absorbs UV light above 290 nm, direct photolysis on soil surfaces is possible. AQUATIC FATE: When released to water, 1-naphthylamine will react with photochemically produced RO2 radicals with an estimated half-life of 115 hours in sunlit natural water. Reaction with hydroxyl radicals in sunlit natural water may also contribute to its removal. Since 1-naphthylamine strongly absorbs UV light above 290 nm, direct photolysis is also possible. Covalent binding of 1-naphthylamine to the humic fraction of soil suggests that adsorption by humic matter in water may be important; the detection of 1-naphthylamine in river sediment indicates that some adsorption does occur. Adsorption to aquatic humic material may lessen the removal rate due to photochemical mechanisms and significantly lengthen the persistence time. Hydrolysis, volatilization, and bioconcentration are not expected to be important. ATMOSPHERIC FATE: 1-Naphthylamine will react in the vapor-phase with photochemically produced hydroxyl radicals at an estimated half-life of 12.7 hours. Since 1-naphthylamine strongly absorbs UV light above 290 nm, direct photolysis is possible.
Drinking Water Impact GROUNDWATER: 1-Naphthylamine was qualitatively detected in groundwater beneath a coal tar distillation and creosote wood preserving facility in St. Louis Park, MN . SURFACE WATER: 1-Napthylamine has been qualitatively detected in the Buffalo River . 1-Naphthylamine was detected in the Sumida River, Japan, along with benzidine, dichlorobenzidine and 2-naphthylamine, at combined concentrations of 0.275-0.562 ppm . EFFL: 1-Naphthylamine was qualitatively found in waste streams at a coal gasification facility in Chicago . Concentrations of 3 ppm was detected in the process water from an oil shale facility in Australia .

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