SPECTRUM

Chemical Fact Sheet

Chemical Abstract Number (CAS #) 1610180
CASRN 1610-18-0
SynonymsPrometon
Pramitol
Gesafram 50
2,4-bis(isopropylamino)-6-methoxy-s-triazine
Analytical Method EPA Method 619
Molecular FormulaC10H19N5O

Link to the National Library of Medicine's Hazardous Substances
Database for more details on this compound.

Use Nonselective preemergence & postemergence herbicide which controls most annual & perennial broadleaf & grassy weeds A NON-SELECTIVE HERBICIDE USED FOR CONTROL OF MOST ANNUAL & PERENNIAL BROAD-LEAVED, GRASS & BRUSH WEEDS ON NON-CROP AREAS AT 10-20 KG AI/HA & MAY BE APPLIED TO THE GROUND BEFORE LAYING ASPHALT. PROMETONE HAS BEEN USED FOR CONTROL OF DEEPROOTED PERENNIAL GRASSES SUCH AS BERMUDA.
Apparent Color COLORLESS POWDER; White, crystalline
Melting Point 91-92 DEG C
Molecular Weight 225.3
Density 1.088 G/CU CM @ 20 DEG C
Environmental Impact Prometone may be released to the environment during its manufacture, transport, storage, formulation and use as a nonselective herbicide for the control of perennial broadleaf and grassy weeds on non-agricultural land. When prometone is applied to soil, it will adsorb moderately to the soil. It is moderately persistent in soil; its estimated half-life in soil is between 1.5 and 6 months. It is not known whether it degrades by chemical or microbial processes. An important mechanism by which prometone is lost from soil is by volatilization. Prometone rises to the soil surface with evaporating water and as the concentration of the herbicide at the soil-air interface increases, the amount of prometone volatilizing increases. If released into water, prometone will partially adsorb to sediment and particulate matter in the water column. Degradation should be slow. Bioconcentration in fish should not be significant. Volatilization should not be an important fate process. In the atmosphere, prometone would be expected to degrade by reaction with photochemically produced hydroxyl radical; its estimated half-life is 2.4 hr. Exposure to prometone will be primarily occupational by skin contact. It is most likely to occur while applying the herbicide or touching treated soil or vegetation. Exposure by inhalation may occur when entering recently treated fields.
Environmental Fate TERRESTRIAL FATE: TRIAZINES ARE NOT READILY DEGRADED BY SOIL MICROORGANISMS. THUS, THEIR RATE OF DECAY IS RELATIVELY SLOW, & AS THESE MATERIALS ALSO DO NOT READILY LEACH FROM THE SOIL, THEY MAY PERSIST FOR QUITE EXTENDED PERIODS OF TIME. TRIAZINES TERRESTRIAL FATE: THE RESIDUAL ACTIVITY OF PROMETONE IN SOIL DEPENDS MAINLY UPON SOIL TYPE, MOISTURE & APPLICATION RATE. UNDER ARID CONDITIONS, IT CAN PERSIST FOR EXTENDED PERIODS. TERRESTRIAL FATE: When prometone is applied to soil, it will adsorb moderately to the soil. Prometone is moderately persistent in soil; its estimated half-life in soil is between 1.5 and 6 months . It is not know whether it degrades by a chemical or microbial process . In a greenhouse experiment using a ryegrass bioassay it took between 4.5 and 20 weeks and >60 wks for 50% and 80% of prometone activity to disappear when the herbicide was applied at 0.25 lb/acre . At an application rate of 1.0 lb/acre >60 weeks were required for half of its phytotoxicity to disappear. No prometone degraded during the course of a 24-day volatilization experiment performed in a special chamber using moist San Joaquin sandy loam at a temperature of 25 deg C . An important mechanism by which prometone is lost from soil is by volatilization. Prometone rises to the soil surface with evaporating water and as the concentration of the herbicide at the soil-air interface increases, its adsorption to the soil decreases and the amount of prometone volatilizing increases. In one experiment 7.6% of applied prometone was lost in 14 days as a result of this wicking effect and subsequent volatilization . Of the 50 kg of prometone used in four Ontario, Canada agricultural watersheds in 1975, an estimated 44 g were lost to water . This is thought to be entirely a result of storm runoff and snow melt from nonagricultural land . AQUATIC FATE: If released into water, prometone will partially adsorb to sediment and particulate matter in the water column. Volatilization should not be a significant fate process. No estimates on the rates of microbial and abiotic degradative process are available. From the available soil data, degradation will be very slow. ATMOSPHERIC FATE: In the atmosphere, prometone would be expected to degrade by reaction with photochemically produced hydroxyl radical. Its estimated half-life is 2.4 hr . TERRESTRIAL FATE: THE LONG SOIL PERSISTENCE OF THESE CMPD DOES CREATE THE PROBLEM OF SOIL CARRY OVER, WHICH CAN DAMAGE SUCCEEDING CASH CROPS. THEREFORE EXTREME CAUTION MUST BE TAKEN IN THEIR APPLICATION ON CROPLAND TO AVOID SUCH INJURY TO FOLLOWING CROPS. TRIAZINES
Drinking Water Impact SURFACE WATER: In a survey of 11 agricultural watersheds in Ontario, prometone was found in 0.2% and 1.5% of samples in 1975-6 and 1976-7, respectively . The mean concentration in positive samples was 0.02 ppb; the highest sample concentration found was 0.1 ppb . Prometone was detected, but not quantified, in selected streams feeding into Lakes Ontario, Erie, Huron and Lake St. Clair . GROUNDWATER: Between 1968 and 1978, only one well out of 237 in Ontario, Canada, analyzed because of suspected contamination, was found to contain prometone . The contamination was caused by diluted herbicide directly or indirectly entering the well and the level of contamination was between 11 and 100 ppb . EFFL: Prometone was reported in the secondary effluent of a municipal treatment plant in Illinois that received industrial discharges . The concentration of prometone in the effluent was not reported.

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