SPECTRUM

Chemical Fact Sheet

Chemical Abstract Number (CAS #) 205823
CASRN 205-82-3
SynonymsBenzo(j)fluoranthene
Analytical Method EPA Method 525.2
Molecular FormulaC20H12

Link to the National Library of Medicine's Hazardous Substances
Database for more details on this compound.

Use EXPERIMENTAL CARCINOGEN BIOCHEMICAL RESEARCH
Apparent Color YELLOW PLATES FROM ALCOHOL, NEEDLES FROM ACETIC ACID; ORANGE NEEDLES FROM BENZENE & ALC
Melting Point 166 DEG C
Molecular Weight 252.32
Environmental Impact Benzo(j)fluoranthene is a component of crude oil and a product of combustion which may be produced and released to the environment during natural fires. Emissions from petroleum refining, coal tar distillation, and the combustion of wood, coal, oil, gasoline and diesel fuels are major contributors of benzo(j)fluoranthene to the environment. Benzo(j)fluoranthene is not commercially produced in the US; however, it may be released to the environment through industrial effluents, municipal waste water treatment facilities and waste incinerators. Benzo(j)fluoranthene is expected to biodegrade very slowly and is not expected to hydrolyze in the environment. A calculated Koc range of 51,000 to 68,000, indicates benzo(j)fluoranthene will be highly immobile in soil. In aquatic systems, benzo(j)fluoranthene partitions from the water column to organic matter contained in sediments and suspended solids. Benzo(j)fluoranthene also has the potential to bioconcentrate in aquatic systems. A Henry's Law constant of 7.39X10-7 atm-cu m/mole at 25 deg C, suggests volatilization of benzo(j)fluoranthene from environmental waters will be slow. The volatilization half-lives from a model river and model pond, the latter considers the effect of adsorption, have been estimated to be 70 days and over 400 years, respectively. In the atmosphere, the vapor phase reaction with photochemically produced hydroxyl radicals (half-life of 7 hr) may be an important fate process. However, benzo(j)fluoranthene is expected to exist almost entirely in the particulate phase in ambient air. Nevertheless, benzo(j)fluoranthene may undergo direct photolysis in the atmosphere. Otherwise, washout by precipitation and gravitational settling may be important atmospheric removal mechanisms for benzo(j)fluoranthene. The most probable human exposure would be occupational exposure, which may occur through dermal contact or inhalation at places where benzo(j)fluoranthene is produced as a product of combustion. Non-occupational exposures would most likely occur via urban atmospheres, cigarette smoking, smoked and barbecued food, contaminated drinking water supplies and recreational activities at contaminated waterways.
Environmental Fate TERRESTRIAL FATE: Limited soil grab sample data suggests the biodegradation of benzo(j)fluoranthene will be very slow . Benzo(j)fluoranthene is not expected to undergo hydrolysis in soils. Yet, benzo(j)fluoranthene absorbs UV light in the environmentally relevant range (>290 nm), with lambda max of 291, 306, 317, 331, 362, 373 and 382 nm in cyclohexane . Therefore, benzo(j)fluoranthene may potentially undergo photolysis in sunlit media. A calculated Koc range of 51000 to 68000 , indicates benzo(j)fluoranthene will be highly immobile in soil . An estimated Henry's Law constant of 7.39X10-7 atm-cu m/mole at 25 deg C , suggests the volatilization of benzo(j)fluoranthene from moist soils will not be important . AQUATIC FATE: Benzo(j)fluoranthene is not expected to undergo hydrolysis in environmental waters. Yet, benzo(j)fluoranthene absorbs UV light in the environmentally relevant range (>290 nm), with lambda max of 291, 306, 317, 331, 362, 373 and 382 nm in cyclohexane . Therefore, benzo(j)fluoranthene may potentially undergo photolysis in sunlit water. Monitoring data and an estimated Koc ranging in the highly immobile class for soil , indicates benzo(j)fluoranthene will partition from the water column to organic matter contained in sediments and suspended solids. Benzo(j)fluoranthene also has the potential to bioconcentrate in aquatic systems. A Henry's Law constant of 7.39X10-7 atm-cu m/mole at 25 deg C suggests volatilization of benzo(j)fluoranthene from environmental waters will be slow . Based on this Henry's Law constant, the volatilization half-life from a model river has been estimated to be 79 days(4,SRC). The volatilization half-life from an model pond, which considers the effect of adsorption, has been estimated to be over 400 years(5,SRC). ATMOSPHERIC FATE: Benzo(j)fluoranthene absorbs UV light in the environmentally relevant range (>290 nm), with lambda max of 291, 306, 317, 331, 362, 373 and 382 nm in cyclohexane . Therefore, benzo(j)fluoranthene may potentially undergo photolysis in ambient air. If released to the atmosphere as a gas, the vapor phase reaction of benzo(j)fluoranthene with photochemically produced hydroxyl radicals is likely to be an important fate process. The rate constant for the vapor-phase reaction of benzo(j)fluoranthene with photochemically produced hydroxyl radicals has been estimated to be 58.4X10-12 cu cm/molecule-sec at 25 deg C; which corresponds to an atmospheric half-life of about 7 hours at an atmospheric concn of 5X10 5 hydroxyl radicals per cu cm . However, based upon a calculated vapor pressure of 1.50X10-8 mm Hg at 25 deg C, benzo(j)fluoranthene is expected to exist almost entirely in the particulate phase in ambient air . Consequently, washout by precipitation and gravitational settling may be important atmospheric removal mechanisms for benzo (j)fluoranthene.
Drinking Water Impact IN DRINKING-WATER, CONCN 1.0-14.0 UG/CU M B(J)F. IN RIVER & LAKE WATER (53-17,840 UG/CU M) DEPENDING ON KIND OF WATER TESTED (WHETHER OR NOT IT CONTAINED INDUSTRIAL EFFLUENTS OR BITUMINOUS CONTAMINATION); WHILE IN SURFACE WATER 4.6-150 UG/CU M HAVE BEEN FOUND. 29.6 MG/CU M IN SEWAGE WATER GROUNDWATER: Benzo(j)fluoranthene was detected in a coal tar contaminated aquifer in St Louis Park, MN . RAIN/SNOW: Rain water in Portland, OR contained benzo(j)fluoranthene at concn of 0.26 and 2.9 ng/L for 2 of 7 samples collected between Feb 12 and April 12, 1984 . EFFL: Benzo(j)fluoranthene was identified as a stack emission and a component of fly ash from municipal waste incinerators(6). Effluent from the Bekkelaget sewage treatment plant benzo(j)fluoranthene was at a concn less than 3 ng/L after dry and rainy days in Nov 1979 . Residential coal and oil burning emits benzo(j)fluoranthene . Gasoline fueled vehicles also emit benzo(j)fluoranthene . A carbon black combustion product and coal tar contained benzo(j)fluoranthene at a concn of 20 ug/g and 5.7 mg/g, respectively . The effluent channel from a coking plant contained benzo(j)fluoranthene in the sediments at concn of 23 ug/g . Domestic fire soot from wood and coal contained benzo(j)fluoranthene at concn ranging from 6 to 117 ug/cu m with an average of 60 ng/cu m for 12 samples collected at Christchurch, New Zealand .

DISCLAIMER - Please Read

Florida-Spectrum List of Services
Florida-Spectrum Homepage