SPECTRUM

Chemical Fact Sheet

Chemical Abstract Number (CAS #) 2234131
CASRN 2234-13-1
SynonymsOctachloronaphthalene
Naphthalene, octachloro-
Halowax 1051
Perchloronaphthalene
Analytical Method EPA Method 8081
Molecular FormulaC10Cl8

Link to the National Library of Medicine's Hazardous Substances
Database for more details on this compound.

Use HAS BEEN UTILIZED AS FIREPROOF, WATERPROOF ADDITIVE IN CABLE INSULATION & IN OTHER PROTECTIVE COATING MATERIALS AND AS ADDITIVE TO LUBRICANTS.
Apparent Color PALE YELLOW; NEEDLES FROM BENZENE & CARBON TETRACHLORIDE; Waxy yellow solid
Odor AROMATIC ODOR
Boiling Point 440 DEG C
Melting Point 192 DEG C
Molecular Weight 403.74
Density 2.00
Sensitivity Data Immediately irritating to eyes and skin.
Environmental Impact Octachloronaphthalene may be released to the environment in waste streams generated at sites of its industrial manufacture or use. Landfilling of products that have used octachloronaphthalene could result in release through leaching. If released to the atmosphere, octachloronaphthalene will degrade slowly in the vapor-phase by reaction with photochemically produced hydroxyl radicals (estimated half-life of 437 days). Physical removal from air can occur through wet and dry deposition processes. If released to water, volatilization and adsorption to sediment may be important transport processes. Accumulation in aquatic sediments may occur. Screening studies have demonstrated that bioconcentration in aquatic organisms may not be important because the size of the octachloronaphthalene molecule may inhibit membrane permeation. If released to soil, octachloronaphthalene is not expected to leach based upon estimated log Koc values of 5.88-6.20. Octachloronaphthalene's chemical structure suggests that it will not biodegrade fast because of the large number of aromatic chloride substitutents. Occupational exposure to chloronaphthalenes occurs primarily through dermal contact.
Environmental Fate TERRESTRIAL FATE: Octachloronaphthalene has estimated Koc values of 750,000-1,600,000(1,SRC); according to a suggested classification scheme , these estimated Koc values suggest that octachloronaphthalene will be essentially immobile in soil; therefore, leaching should not be an important fate process. There are no known abiotic processes that will degrade octachloronaphthalene within soil systems. Some surface photolysis may be possible on soil surfaces exposed to sunlight, but insufficient data are available to predict its potential importance. Octachloronaphthalene's large number of aromatic chloride substituents suggests that it will not biodegrade fast in soil ; its biodegradability has been reported as "poor" ; therefore, octachloronaphthalene may be relatively persistent in soil. AQUATIC FATE: Volatilization and adsorption to sediment may be an important transport processes for octachloronaphthalene in water. In the absence of strong adsorption, volatilization half-lives of 43 hr and 19.5 days have been estimated for a model river (one meter deep) and environmental pond (2 meters deep), respectively(1-2,SRC); with maximum adsorption, the half-life from the pond may exceed one year(2,SRC). Estimated log Koc values of 5.88-6.20(1,SRC) suggest that partitioning from the water column to sediment and suspended material will occur. Octachloronaphthalene's large number of aromatic chloride substitutents suggests that it will not biodegrade fast in soil ; its biodegradability has been reported as poor ; therefore, aquatic sediments may be an important environmental sink for octachloronaphthalene. Screening studies have measured fish bioconcentration factors (BCFs) of 0-330(4,6); the large size of the octachloronaphthalene molecule may inhibit membrane permeation and result in low bioconcentration . ATMOSPHERIC FATE: Based upon an extrapolated vapor pressure of 1X10-8 mm Hg at 25 deg C(1,SRC), octachloronaphthalene can exist in both the vapor-phase and particulate-phase in the ambient atmosphere(2,SRC); at this vapor-pressure, the particulate-phase may dominate(2,SRC). It will degrade slowly in the atmosphere by the vapor-phase reaction with photochemically produced hydroxyl radicals with an estimated half-life of about 437 days(3,SRC). Direct photolysis may contribute to its atmospheric degradation. Particulate-phase octachloronaphthalene can be physically removed from air by dry and wet deposition processes. EFFL: Octachloronaphthalene concns of 50-130 ug/L were detected in industrial wastewaters from aluminum smelting processes that used either hexachloroethane-chlorine gas or dichloroethane-Freon gas treatments .

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