SPECTRUM

Chemical Fact Sheet

Chemical Abstract Number (CAS #) 2303164
CASRN 2303-16-4
SynonymsDiallate
S-(2,3-Dichloroallyl) diisopropyl-thiocarbamate
Carbamothioic acid, bis(1-methylethyl)-S-(2,3-dichloro-2-propenyl) ester
Avadex
2,3-DCDT
Analytical Method EPA Method 8081
Molecular FormulaC10H17Cl2NOS

Link to the National Library of Medicine's Hazardous Substances
Database for more details on this compound.

Use AN EXTREMELY ACTIVE PRE-EMERGENCE HERBICIDE AGAINST CERTAIN ANNUAL MONOCOTS, PARTICULARLY AVENA FATUA, WITH SAFETY FOR CEREAL GRAINS AT RATES NECESSARY TO CONTROL THE WEEDS. IT HAS ALSO SHOWN PROMISE AS A SPROUT INHIBITOR IN POTATOES. USED AS A BEFORE OR AFTER PLANTING TREATMENT DEPENDING ON CROP FOR CONTROL OF WILD OATS. FOR USE ON ALFALFA, ALSIKE CLOVER, BARLEY, CORN, FLAX, SOYBEANS, LENTILS, PEAS, POTATOES, RED CLOVER, SUGAR BEETS, AND SWEET CLOVER. WORKS WELL UNDER MANY SOIL AND CLIMATIC CONDITIONS. HERBICIDE FOR FIELD CROPS-EG, SUGAR BEETS & LENTILS HERBICIDE FOR FLAX & PEAS
Consumption Patterns HERBICIDE FOR SUGAR BEETS, 88%; OTHER FIELD CROPS, 12% (1982)
Apparent Color BROWN LIQUID; Oily liquid
Boiling Point 150 DEG C @ 9 MM HG
Melting Point 25-30 deg C
Molecular Weight 270.24
Density 1.188 @ 25 DEG C/15.6 DEG C
Sensitivity Data SLIGHTLY IRRITATING TO SKIN AND EYES. THE CONCENTRATE MAY CAUSE IRRITATION TO SKIN, EYES, & MUCOUS MEMBRANES.
Environmental Impact Diallate is a mixture of the Z- and E-isomers. Diallate will be released to the environment during its application as a pre-emergence herbicide for field crops such as sugar beets, flax, lentels, and peas. Releases may also occur during formulation, transport, and storage. Diallate is generally incorporated into the soil and it will be lost (half-life 2-6 wk) principally by biodegradation although adsorption to soil and to a lesser extent volatilization and photodegradation are also important. Diallate released to the atmosphere as aerosols or by volatilization from soil will be subject to gravitational settling and photodegradation. If released to water, a combination of adsorption to sediment, photodegradation and microbial degradation will occur but no experimental data applicable to natural systems are available. Only moderate bioconcentration in fish would be expected. Human exposure is principally occupational.
Environmental Fate TERRESTRIAL FATE: Diallate disappears from a variety of agricultural soils with a half-life of 2-6 weeks. The major routes of loss in decending order of importance are biodegradation, adsorption to soil, and volatilization . There is some evidence that microbial degradation is more dominant when adsorptive forces are weaker . The kinetics of diallate loss from soil is complex and appear to lie between first and second order . The only volatile degradation product is carbon dioxide . When applied to field plots in May, all the diallate was degraded within the growing season . AQUATIC FATE: Diallate released into water would adsorb to sediment and particulate matter in the water column. It will also photodegrade in surface layers and possibly biodegrade, however, no experimental data for these degradative processes in natural water systems could be found. ATMOSPHERIC FATE: Diallate released to the atmosphere during its application or volatilized from soil will photodegrade. Vapor phase diallate will react with photochemically produced hydroxyl radicals and have an estimated half-life of 5.1 hours . The half-life of diallate in aerosols is approximately 8 days . Aerosols and diallate adsorbed to particulate matter will also be subject to gravitational settling. ENVIRONMENTAL PERSISTENCE: AT 42 DEG C 52, 53, & 56% DIALLATE REMAINED ON REGINA CLAY @ 7, 14, & 28 DAYS, RESPECTIVELY. FOR WEYBURN LOAM CORRESPONDING FIGURES WERE 81, 82, & 83% & FOR ASQUITE SANDY LOAM 98, 98, & 93%. AMT REMAINING @ 50 DEG C WAS 45-60% FOR ALL SOIL TYPES. LOSSES WERE NEGLIGIBLE @ 22 OR - 2 DEG C.

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