SPECTRUM

Chemical Fact Sheet

Chemical Abstract Number (CAS #) 2631370
CASRN 2631-37-0
SynonymsPromecarb
Carbamic acid, methyl-, m-cum-5-yl ester
Phenol, 3-methyl-5-(1-methylethyl)-, methylcarbamate
Carbamult
Analytical Methods EPA Method 8318
Molecular FormulaC12H17NO2

Link to the National Library of Medicine's Hazardous Substances
Database for more details on this compound.

Use INSECTICIDE (NON-US USE ONLY) Promecarb is used as a non-systemic contact insecticide against lepidopterous pests and leaf miners of fruits. For Colorado potato beetle, corn rootworm.
Apparent Color COLORLESS CRYSTALLINE SOLID
Odor ALMOST ODORLESS
Boiling Point 117 DEG C AT 0.1 MM HG
Melting Point 87-87.5 DEG C
Molecular Weight 207.28
Environmental Impact Promecarb is released directly into the environment from its application and use as a contact insecticide. If released to the atmosphere, gas-phase promecarb is expected to degrade rapidly (estimated half-life of 5 hr) by reaction with photochemically produced hydroxyl radicals. Particulate-phase promecarb may be removed physically from air by wet and dry deposition. If released to water, hydrolysis appears to be an important degradation process. The aqueous hydrolysis half-life has been estimated to be 1.2 days at 25 deg C and pH 7; the hydrolysis rate is expected to increase under alkaline conditions, but may decrease significantly in acidic natural waters. If released to soil, promecarb is expected to degrade chemically under moist conditions via hydrolysis with the rate increasing under alkaline conditions and decreasing under acidic conditions. Promecarb may leach moderately in soil, although leaching in neutral and alkaline soils may not be important due to concurrent hydrolysis. The N-methylcarbamate pesticides (of which promecarb is a member) are generally biodegradable and of low soil persistence. Occupational exposure to promecarb may be possible through dermal contact and inhalation to workers involved with applying or formulating promecarb pesticides.
Environmental Fate TERRESTRIAL FATE: The N-methylcarbamate pesticides (of which promecarb is a member) are generally biodegradable and of low soil persistence . Chemical degradation of promecarb in moist soil is expected to proceed via hydrolysis. The aqueous hydrolysis half-life has been estimated to be 1.2 days at 25 deg C and pH 7; the hydrolysis rate is expected to increase under alkaline conditions, but decrease with acidity in soil. Promecarb is expected to have low to moderate soil mobility which suggests that some leaching may be possible. Leaching in neutral and alkaline soils may not be significant, however, due to concurrent hydrolysis. AQUATIC FATE: Hydrolysis appears to be an important degradation process for promecarb in water. The aqueous hydrolysis half-life has been estimated to be 1.2 days at 25 deg C and pH 7 ; the hydrolysis rate is expected to increase under alkaline conditions, but may decrease significantly in acidic in natural waters. ATMOSPHERIC FATE: Based upon a vapor pressure of 0.00003 mm Hg at 25 deg C , promecarb can be expected to exist in both the gas phase and particulate phase in the ambient atmosphere(2,SRC). Gas phase promecarb is expected to degrade rapidly in air by reaction with photochemically produced hydroxyl radicals; the half-life for this reaction in an average atmosphere has been estimated to be about 5 hr. Particulate phase promecarb may be physically removed from air via wet and dry deposition.

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