SPECTRUM

Chemical Fact Sheet

Chemical Abstract Number (CAS #) 333415
CASRN 333-41-5
SynonymsDiazinon
Spectracide
Phosphorodithioic acid, O,O-diethyl O-(2-isopropyl-6-methyl-4-pyrimidinyl) ester
Dipofene
Diazitol
Basudin
Analytical Method EPA Method 8141
Molecular FormulaC12H21N2O3PS

Link to the National Library of Medicine's Hazardous Substances
Database for more details on this compound.

Use INSECTICIDE FOR NON-AGRICULTURAL USE (EG, HOME & GARDEN) & FOR AGRICULTURAL USE (EG, ALFALFA & CORN). ACARICIDE Insecticide (use against fire ants permitted by EPA). A non-systemic insecticide, its main applications are in fruit trees, horticultural crops, maize, potatoes, rice, sugarcane, tobacco and vineyards for a wide range of sucking and leaf-eating insects. Also, used against flies in glasshouses, mushroom houses. TO CONTROL TICKS & OTHER INSECTS ON ANIMALS & PREMISES CONTROLLING FACE FLY LARVAE IN MANURE. VET: Used against flies and ticks in veterinary practice.
Consumption Patterns NON-AGRICULTURAL USE-EG, IN HOME, GARDEN & LAWN PRODUCTS, 43%; ALFALFA, 12%; CORN, 5%; SOYBEANS, 5%; VEGETABLES, 5%; DECIDUOUS FRUITS & NUTS, 3%; WHEAT, 2%; COTTON, 2%; SORGHUM, 2%; OTHER FIELD CROPS-EG, PEANUTS, RICE, SUGARCANE, SMALL GRAINS, & CITRUS, 21% (1982 INSECTICIDE USE).
Apparent Color COLORLESS LIQUID
Odor FAINT ESTER-LIKE ODOR
Boiling Point 83-84 DEG C AT 2X10-3 MM HG
Molecular Weight 304.36
Density SP GR: 1.116-1.118 @ 20 DEG C/4 DEG C
Environmental Impact Diazinon's release to the environment will result from its manufacture and use as a non-systemic insecticide used principally on rice, fruit trees, vineyards, sugarcane, corn, tobacco, potatoes and horticultural crops and in pest control strips. If it is released to soil it will not strongly bind to the soil and will be expected to exhibit moderate mobility in the soil. Hydrolysis has been reported to be slow at pH >6, but may be significant in some soils. Biodegradation will be expected to be a major fate process in soils with reported half-lives of <1,2, and 5 weeks in non-sterile soils. Photolysis may be significant on the surface of soils, but evaporation from the surface of soils is not expected to be a significant transport process. If it is released to water it may sorb to sediments moderately but it will not bioconcentrate in aquatic organisms. Hydrolysis may be a significant fate process with reported half-lives of 31 days (pH 5), 185 days (pH 7.4), and 136 days (pH 9.0) at 20 deg C and 2-3 weeks in distilled water at pH 6 at room temperature; major products of hydrolysis are 2-isopropyl-4-methyl-6-hydroxypyrimidine and diethyl thiophosphoric acid or diethyl phosphoric acid. Biodegradation and photolysis may be significant fate processes in natural waters. Evaporation may be significant with a half-life of 46 days predicted for evaporation from a river 1 m deep, flowing at 1 m/sec with a wind velocity of 3 m/sec. If diazinon is released to the atmosphere it may be subject to direct photolysis since it adsorbs light >290 nm. The estimated vapor phase half-life in the atmosphere is 4.83 hrs as a result of reaction with photochemically produced hydroxyl radicals. Exposure to diazinon will occur through the ingestion of contaminated water and food and the inhalation of contaminated air. Exposure will also occur through occupational exposure.
Environmental Fate DIAZINON IS RELATIVELY NONPERSISTENT IN SOIL. MOST DIAZINON APPLIED IS LOST FROM SOIL THROUGH CHEMICAL & BIOLOGIC DEGRADATION WITHIN ABOUT 2 MO OF APPLICATION. ABOUT 46% OF DIAZINON ADDED TO NEUTRAL AQ SOLN REMAINED AFTER 2 WK. TERRESTRIAL FATE: If diazinon is released to soil, it will not be expected to strongly bind to the soil and will be expected to exhibit moderate mobility in the soil. Hydrolysis has been reported to be slow at pH >6, but may be significant in some soils. Biodegradation will be expected to be a major fate process in soils with reported half-lives of <1, 2, and 5 weeks in non-sterile soils compared to half-lives of 6, 6.5, and 12.5 weeks in sterile soils(1,2). Overall persistence in soils has been reported to be 3-14 weeks . Photolysis may be significant on the surface of soils. Evaporation from the surface of soils is not expected to be a significant transport process. AQUATIC FATE: If diazinon is released to water it may sorb to sediments moderately but will not bioconcentrate in aquatic organisms. Hydrolysis may be a significant fate process with reported half-lives of 31 days (pH 5), 185 days (pH 7.4), and 136 days (pH 9) at 20 deg C and 2-3 weeks in distilled water at pH 6 at room temperature ; major products of hydrolysis were 2-isopropyl-4-methyl-6-hydroxypyrimidine and diethyl thiophosphoric acid or diethyl phosphoric acid . Biodegradation may be a significant fate process in natural waters. Photolysis may be an important fate process based on 36% photolysis in pH 7 buffer solution exposed to light >290 nm in 24 hrs . Evaporation may be significant with a half-life of 46 days predicted for evaporation from a river 1 m deep, flowing at 1 m/sec with a wind velocity of 3 m/sec . ATMOSPHERIC FATE: If diazinon is released to the atmosphere it may be subject to direct photolysis since it adsorbs light >290 nm. The estimated vapor phase half-life in the atmosphere is 4.83 hrs as a result of reaction with photochemically produced hydroxyl radicals.
Drinking Water Impact DRINKING WATER: California, 54 wells, detected, not quantified . Ottawa, in Ontario, Canada, tap water, not detected (<1 parts per trillion ) . Japan tap water, 0.9-4.7 ppt . SURFACE WATER: USEPA STORET database, 21,978 whole water samples, 0-33.4 ppm, avg 1.7 ppb, 359 filtered water samples, 0-1.0 ppb, avg 0.031 ppb . National surface water monitoring program, 1976-80, 1.2% pos samples, max concn 2.38 ppb . US selected streams, 1968-71, 448 samples, 1.6% pos, 0.01-0.10 ppb, avg of pos, 0.04 ppb . Beaver River, Beaver Falls, PA, 0.09 ppb . Ontario, Canada, 1975-77, 11 agricultural watersheds, 0.1% pos samples, not detected-0.15 parts per trillion, max individual avg, <0.01 parts per trillion, overall avg <0.01 parts per trillion . Diazion was not detected (detection limit = 1 ppb) in a 1985-1987 study of drainage ditch water on farms in British Columbia, Canada in an area where the pesticide is known to be used even though the pesticide was sporadically found in the sediments of the ditches(6). EFFL: Effluent from wastewater treatment plants, 10 plants, 10% pos .

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