SPECTRUM

Chemical Fact Sheet

Chemical Abstract Number (CAS #) 3689245
CASRN 3689-24-5
SynonymsSulfotepp
Tetraethyldithiopyrophosphate
Bladafum
Dithiopyrophosphoric acid, tetraethyl ester
Thiopyrophosphoric acid ([(HO)2P(S)]2O), tetraethyl ester
Analytical Method EPA Method 8141
Molecular FormulaC8H20O5P2S2

Link to the National Library of Medicine's Hazardous Substances
Database for more details on this compound.

Use INSECTICIDE; ACARICIDE GREENHOUSE FUMIGANT TO CONTROL APHIDS, SPIDER MITES, THRIPS, & WHITEFLIES.
Apparent Color COLORLESS OIL ; PALE YELLOW LIQUID
Odor GARLIC ODOR
Boiling Point 136-139 DEG C @ 2 MM HG
Melting Point 88 deg C
Molecular Weight 322.32
Density 1.196 @ 25 DEG C/4 DEG C
Environmental Impact Dithion was used as an insecticide primarily in the fumigation of greenhouses. Dithion may have entered the atmosphere as a result of fugitive emissions during its manufacture and formulation, and also during its application. If released to soil, it can be expected to display low mobility. Neither hydrolysis, nor volatilization from the soil surface to the atmosphere are expected to be significant fate processes. If released to water, dithion can be expected to adsorb to sediment and suspended organic matter. Volatilization may be a significant process; the volatilization half-life from a model river can be estimated to be 23 days. Adsorption, however, may attenuate this process. Direct photolysis in pure water has not been observed, yet the addition of 10 mg/l of humic acid results in a half-life of 28.4 hr under laboratory conditions. Hydrolysis of dithion in water is not expected to be a significant process. In the atmosphere, dithion can be expected to exist predominately in the vapor phase. The half-life for the gas phase reaction of dithion with photochemically produced hydroxyl radicals can be estimated to be 2.2 hours; thus, it is expected to be a dominant fate process. Direct photochemical degradation is not expected to be significant. In the absence of other atmospheric removal processes, rain washout may occur. Occupational exposure to dithion may occur by dermal contact or inhalation during its manufacture and formulation, and during the fumigation of greenhouses with this insecticide. The general population may be exposed by ingestion since this pesticide has been found in leaf and stem vegetables.
Environmental Fate TERRESTRIAL FATE: If released to soil, dithion would not be expected to leach through soil, as a Koc of 749 suggests only low mobility in soil . Hydrolysis is not expected to be a significant fate process . Based on the estimated Henry's Law constant 2.9X10-6 atm cu-m/mol at 20 deg C(4,5,SRC), volatilization from the soil surface to the atmosphere may occur, but it is not expected to be a rapid process. AQUATIC FATE: If released to water a reported Koc estimate of 740 suggests that dithion is expected to adsorb to sediment and suspended organic matter(2,SRC). The estimated volatilization half-life for a model river 1 m deep, flowing at 1 m/sec, and a wind velocity of 3 m/sec is 23 days(3,SRC). Adsorption to sediment and suspended organic matter can be expected to attenuate this process. Hydrolysis is not expected to be a significant fate process(4,SRC). ATMOSPHERIC FATE: If released to the atmosphere, dithion can be expected to exist almost entirely in the vapor phase . Rapid destruction by the gas phase reaction with photochemically produced hydroxyl radicals is expected to be the dominant fate process; the half life for this reaction can be estimated to be 2.2 hours(2,SRC). Direct photochemical degradation is not expected to be a significant fate process based upon a lack of reaction in distilled water (3,SRC). Based on the water solubility, 25 mg/l at room temperature , wet deposition may occur in the absence of other removal mechanisms.

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