SPECTRUM

Chemical Fact Sheet

Chemical Abstract Number (CAS #) 541731
CASRN 541-73-1
Synonyms1,3-Dichlorobenzene
Benzene, 1,3-dichloro-
m-Dichlorobenzene
Analytical Methods EPA Method 502.2
EPA Method 503.1
EPA Method 524.2
EPA Method 601
EPA Method 602
EPA Method 612
EPA Method 624
EPA Method 625
EPA Method 8010
EPA Method 8021
EPA Method 8120
EPA Method 8270
EPA Method 8260
Molecular FormulaC6H4Cl2

Link to the National Library of Medicine's Hazardous Substances
Database for more details on this compound.

Use FUMIGANT & INSECTICIDE /REACTED WITH POTASSIUM HYDROXIDE OR SODIUM HYDROXIDE TO PRODUCE CHLOROPHENOLS; USED IN THE PREPARATION OF ARYLENE SULFIDE POLYMERS IN THE PPS POLYMERIZATION PROCESS
Apparent Color COLORLESS LIQUID
Boiling Point 173.53 @ 10 deg C
Melting Point -24.7 deg C
Molecular Weight 147.00
Density 1.2884 @ 20 deg C/4 deg C
Sensitivity Data VAPORS AND SPRAYS ARE IRRITATING TO EYES, NOSE AND THROAT.
Environmental Impact Chemical waste dump leachates and direct manufacturing effluents are reported to be the major source of pollution of the chlorobenzenes (including the dichlorobenzenes) to Lake Ontario. Use of 1,3-dichlorobenzene as a fumigant will release it directly to the atmosphere. If released to soil, 1,3-dichlorobenzene can be moderately to tightly adsorbed. Leaching from hazardous waste disposal areas has occurred and the detection of 1,3-dichlorobenzene in various groundwaters indicates that leaching can occur. Volatilization from soil surfaces may be an important transport mechanism. It is possible that 1,3-dichlorobenzene will be slowly biodegraded in soil under aerobic conditions. Chemical transformation by hydrolysis, oxidation or direct photolysis are not expected to occur in soil. If released to water, adsorption to sediment will be a major environmental fate process based upon extensive monitoring data in the Great Lakes area and Koc values. Analysis of Lake Ontario sediment cores has indicated the presence and persistence of 1,3-dichlorobenzene since before 1940. 1,3-Dichlorobenzene is volatile from the water column with an estimated half-life of 4.1 hours from a river one meter deep flowing 1 m/sec with a wind velocity of 3 m/sec at 20 deg C; adsorption to sediment will attenuate volatilization. Aerobic biodegradation in water may be possible, however, anaerobic biodegradation is not expected to occur. Experimental BCF values of 89-740 have been reported and 1,3-dichlorobenzene has been detected in trout from Lake Ontario. Hydrolysis, oxidation, and direct photolysis in aquatic environment are not expected to be important. If released to air, 1,3-dichlorobenzene will exist predominantly in the vapor-phase and will react with photochemically produced hydroxyl radicals at an estimated half-life rate of 14 days in a typical atmosphere. Direct photolysis in the troposphere is not expected to be important. The detection of 1,3-dichlorobenzene in rainwater suggests that atmospheric removal via wash-out is possible. General population exposure to 1,3-dichlorobenzene may occur through oral consumption of contaminated drinking water and food (particularly fish) and through inhalation of contaminated air since 1,3-dichlorobenzene has been detected in ambient air.
Environmental Fate AQUATIC FATE: Based on Koc values of 12600-31600 calculated from sediment/water monitoring data and extensive sediment monitoring data in the Great Lakes area, adsorption to sediment is a major environmental fate process for 1,3-dichlorobenzene. Its detection in Lake Ontario sediment cores indicates that 1,3-dichlorobenzene has persisted in these sediments since before 1940 . 1,3-Dichlorobenzene is volatile from water with an estimated half-life of 4.1 hours from a model river one meter deep flowing 1 m/sec with a wind velocity of 3 m/sec at 20 deg C; adsorption to sediment in water will attenuate volatilization. 1,3-Dichlorobenzene may biodegrade in aerobic water after microbial adaptation, however, it is not expected to biodegrade under anaerobic conditions which may exist in lake sediments or various groundwaters. Experimental BCF values of 89-740 have been reported ; the detection of 1,3-dichlorobenzene in trout from Lake Ontario has confirmed this level of bioaccumulation. Hydrolysis, oxidation and direct photolysis in aquatic environment are not expected to be important. ATMOSPHERIC FATE: 1,3-Dichlorobenzene will exist predominantly in the vapor-phase in the atmosphere. The half-life for the vapor-phase reaction of 1,3-dichlorobenzene with photochemically produced hydroxyl radicals in the atmosphere has been estimated to be 14 days. Direct photolysis is not expected to be important. The detection of 1,3-dichlorobenzene in rainwater suggests that atmospheric removal via wash-out is possible. TERRESTRIAL FATE: Based on experimental adsorption data, 1,3-dichlorobenzene can be moderately to tightly adsorbed to soil. Leaching from hazardous waste disposal areas in Niagara Falls to adjacent surface waters has been reported and the detection of 1,3-dichlorobenzene in various groundwaters indicates that leaching can occur. Volatilization from soil surfaces may be an important transport mechanism; however, volatilization may be attenuated by tight adsorption or leaching. It is possible that 1,3-dichlorobenzene will be slowly biodegraded in soil under aerobic conditions. Chemical transformation processes such as hydrolysis, oxidation or direct photolysis (on soil surfaces) are not expected to occur.
Drinking Water Impact DRINKING WATER: A mean 1,3-dichlorobenzene concn of 0.001 ppb was detected in drinking water samples from 3 cities near Lake Ontario in 1980 . Concn of 0.5 ppb identified in Miami, FL drinking water and qualitative detections were reported for Philadelphia, PA and Cincinnati, OH . 1,3-Dichlorobenzene was not detected in 945 finished water supplies throughout the USA that use groundwater sources . Qualitative detection was reported for Cleveland, OH tap water . Qualitative detection was reported for two drinking water supply sources in the United Kingdom . In a analysis of 30 potable Canadian water sources, 1,3-dichlorobenzene was detected at an average concn below 1 ppb(6). GROUNDWATER: 1,3-Dichlorobenzene was detected in 19 of 685 groundwaters analyzed in NJ during 1977-1979 with 236.8 ppb the highest concn found . 1,3-Dichlorobenzene was identified in groundwaters at locations using rapid infiltration for wastewater treatment near Ft Devens, MA, Boulder, CO and Phoenix, AZ at concn of 0.05-0.56 ppb . SURFACE WATERS: 1,3-Dichlorobenzene was detected in 19 of 463 surface waters analyzed in NJ during 1977-1979 with 241.5 ppb the highest concn found . Mean concn of 1 parts per trillion detected in the Grand River during 1980 near Niagara Falls; concn of 0-18 parts per trillion found in the Niagara River . Concn of 2.1-110 parts per trillion (mean concn of 11 parts per trillion) detected in Niagara River at Niagara-On-The-Lake between 1981 and 1983 . Concn of 2.4-85 parts per trillion (mean concn of 7.8 parts per trillion) detected in the Niagara River between 1981 and 1983 . An average concn of 15 parts per trillion was found in the Niagara River near Niagara-On-The-Lake between Sept and Oct 1982 . Positive detection of 1,3-dichlorobenzene was reported by 0.3% of 986 USEPA STORET stations(6). Qualitative detection reported for the Delaware and Raritan Canal in NJ(7). Concn below 0.5 ppb detected in the Rhine River between 1978-1982(8). An average concn of 0.05 ppb found in the Rhine River near Dusseldorf(9). SEA WATER: 1,3-Dichlorobenzene was detected in the water column of the Narragansett Bay near Rhode Island . RAIN/SNOW: A mean 1,3-dichlorobenzene concn of 0.002 parts per trillion was detected in Portland, OR rainwater during March-April 1982 . EFFL: The wastewater effluents from four water treatment plants discharging into the Grand River and Lake Ontario contained a mean 1,3-dichlorobenzene concn of 14 parts per trillion during 1980 sampling . Positive detection of 1,3-dichlorobenzene was reported by 1.5% of 1301 USEPA STORET stations . Dichlorobenzene isomers were detected in wastewater effluents from 7 treatment facilities in Illinois . The dichlorobenzene isomers were qualitatively detected in waters adjacent to hazardous waste disposal areas in Niagara Falls, NY as a result of leaching . Flue gas effluents from a municipal refuse-fired steam boiler in Virginia contained 4.4 ug/cu m of the dichlorobenzene isomers ; flue gas effluents from a refuse-derived-fired power plant in Ohio contained 7.8 ng/cu m of the dichlorobenzene isomers .

DISCLAIMER - Please Read

Florida-Spectrum List of Services
Florida-Spectrum Homepage