SPECTRUM

Chemical Fact Sheet

Chemical Abstract Number (CAS #) 56495
CASRN 56-49-5
Synonyms3-Methylcholanthrene
Benz[j]aceanthrylene, 1,2-dihydro-3-methyl-
Analytical Method EPA Method 8270
Molecular FormulaC21H16

Link to the National Library of Medicine's Hazardous Substances
Database for more details on this compound.

Use RESEARCH CHEMICAL Use: experimentally in cancer research Used in research to induce specific forms of cytochrome p450 (MC1 and 2). Methylcholanthrene synthesized and used in biochemical research.
Apparent Color PALE YELLOW, SLENDER PRISMS FROM BENZENE PLUS ETHER
Boiling Point 280 DEG C AT 80 MM HG
Melting Point 179 DEG C
Molecular Weight 268.34
Density 1.28 AT 20 DEG C
Sensitivity Data ON DIRECT CONTACT IT IS MODERATELY, & ON REPEATED EXPOSURE HIGHLY, IRRITANT.
Environmental Impact Methylcholanthrene (MC) is not an environmental pollutant but is used in biochemical research. If released to soil, it will adsorb very strongly to the soil and should not leach. It will not hydrolyze, and/or biodegrade in soils and evaporation may occur depending on the carbon content of soils. If released to water, MC will be expected to adsorb very strongly to sediments and to bioconcentrate in aquatic organisms. It will not hydrolyze and will not be expected to significantly biodegrade. Evaporation may be important; however, adsorption will limit this process. It may be subject to direct photolysis in sunlight and may react with peroxyl radicals. If methylchloanthrene is released to the atmosphere, it may be subject to direct photolysis; the estimated half-life in the atmosphere is 2.81 hrs as a result of reaction with photochemically produced hydroxyl radicals. Exposure to MC will be associated with its use in biochemical research.
Environmental Fate TERRESTRIAL FATE: If methylcholanthrene (MC) is released to soil it will be expected to adsorb very strongly to the soil and will not be expected to leach to the groundwater. Very little data concerning the biodegradation of MC was located in the literature. Based on the limited data located, MC may be subject to biodegradation in soils. MC will not be expected to hydrolyze. Based on estimated evaporation rates from water, evaporation from soils may be an important process, but adsorption will limit the rate. AQUATIC FATE: If released to water, methylcholanthrene (MC) will be expected to adsorb very strongly to sediments and to bioconcentrate in aquatic organisms. MC will not be expected to hydrolyze, but evaporation may be an important process with an estimated half-life of 7.7 hr predicted for evaporation from a river 1 m deep, flowing at 1 m/sec with a wind velocity of 3 m/sec. Adsorption to sediments and particulates will limit evaporation. MC will not be expected to appreciably biodegrade based on the limited data located in the literature. MC may be subject to direct photolysis to reaction with peroxyl radicals. ATMOSPHERIC FATE: If methylcholanthrene is released to the atmosphere, it may be subject to direct photolysis in sunlight. The estimated half-life of vapor phase methylcholanthrene in the atmosphere is 2.81 hr as a result of reaction with photochemically produced hydroxyl radicals . However, it should exist mostly adsorbed to particulate matter which should stabilize it to photooxidation processes.

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