SPECTRUM

Chemical Fact Sheet

Chemical Abstract Number (CAS #) 598312
CASRN 598-31-2
SynonymsBromoacetone
2-Propanone, 1-bromo-
Analytical Methods EPA Method 8010
EPA Method 8260
Molecular FormulaC3H5BrO

Link to the National Library of Medicine's Hazardous Substances
Database for more details on this compound.

Use CHEMICAL WAR GAS (FORMER USE) ORGANIC SYNTHESIS; TEAR GAS
Apparent Color COLORLESS LIQUID; RAPIDLY BECOMES VIOLET EVEN IN ABSENCE OF AIR
Odor PUNGENT ODOR
Boiling Point 137 deg C; 63.5-64 deg C at 50 mm Hg
Melting Point -36.5 DEG C
Molecular Weight 136.99
Density 1.634 @ 23 DEG C
Sensitivity Data POISONOUS & INTENSELY IRRITATING TO SKIN & MUCOUS MEMBRANES.
Environmental Impact Bromoacetone occurs naturally in the essential oil of a seaweed species that grows in the ocean around the Hawaiian Islands. If released to the atmosphere, it will degrade via reaction with photochemically produced hydroxyl radicals (estimated half-life of 53 days in an average atmosphere), although degradation via photolysis may be more rapid. Physical removal from air by rainfall is possible. If released to water, photolysis may be an important degradation process. Volatilization from water is not rapid, but may be important in the absence of significant degradation processes. If bromoacetone is spilled into a body of water, it will sink to the bottom of the water column, dissolve slowly and turn violet rapidly. If released to soil, significant leaching may be possible. Evaporation from dry surfaces is likely to occur. The potential significance of biodegradation in soil or water is not known. Exposure of bromoacetone can occur through consumption of specific seaweeds found in the region of the Hawaiian Islands. With the exception of this specific exposure, there is no evidence that the general population is exposed to bromoacetone.
Environmental Fate TERRESTRIAL FATE: Estimated Koc values (<50) indicate that bromoacetone is highly mobile in soil and susceptible to significant leaching. Photolysis may occur on soil surfaces exposed to sunlight. Bromoacetone's vapor pressure of 9.0 mm Hg at 20 deg C indicates that evaporation from dry surfaces is likely to occur. The potential significance of biological or chemical degradation processes in soil are not known. AQUATIC FATE: Although kinetic rate data are not available, photolysis may be an important degradation process for bromoacetone in sunlit water. Volatilization from water is not rapid (estimated half-lives of 3.7 days from a shallow model river 1 m deep and 40 days from an environmental pond), but may be important in the absence of significant degradation processes. Aquatic bioconcentration and adsorption to sediment are not expected to be important. The potential significance of biodegradation or chemical hydrolysis are not known. If bromoacetone is spilled into a body of water, it will sink to the bottom of the water column, dissolve slowly and turn violet rapidly(1,SRC). ATMOSPHERIC FATE: Based on a vapor-pressure of 9.0 mm Hg at 20 deg C , bromoacetone is expected to exist almost entirely in the vapor-phase in the ambient atmosphere(1,2,SRC). Vapor-phase bromoacetone is degraded in the atmosphere by reaction with photochemically produced hydroxyl radicals (estimated half-life of 53 days in an average atmosphere). Although kinetic rate data are not available, direct photolysis may degrade bromoacetone much more rapidly than reaction via hydroxyl radicals. Its relatively high water solubility suggests that physical removal via wet deposition is likely.

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