SPECTRUM

Chemical Fact Sheet

Chemical Abstract Number (CAS #) 60093
CASRN 60-09-3
SynonymsAminoazobenzene
Aniline, p-(phenylazo)-
4-Phenylazoaniline
Molecular FormulaC12H11N3

Link to the National Library of Medicine's Hazardous Substances
Database for more details on this compound.

Use IN DYES (CHRYSOIDINE, INDULINE, SOLID YELLOW & ACID YELLOW); INSECTICIDES USED AS DYE FOR LACQUERS, VARNISHES, WAX PRODUCTS, OIL STAINS & STYRENE RESINS & AS INTERMEDIATE IN MFR OF ACID YELLOW, DIAZO DYES & INDULINES.
Apparent Color BROWNISH-YELLOW NEEDLES WITH BLUISH CAST; ORANGE MONOCLINIC NEEDLES FROM ALCOHOL; Yellow to tan crystals
Boiling Point ABOVE 360 DEG C
Melting Point 128 DEG C
Molecular Weight 197.23
Environmental Impact 4-Aminoazobenzene may be released to the environment in wastewater during it's production and use as a dye and as a chemical intermediate. If released on land, 4-aminoazobenzene should bind strongly to soil and undergo soil- or clay-catalyzed oxidation and possibly biodegrade. If released in water, it should bind strongly to sediment and undergo soil- or clay-catalyzed oxidation, photolyze, or biodegrade. It should not bioconcentrate appreciably in aquatic organisms. However, because of the lack of experimental data, the fate of 4-aminoazobenzene in natural waters is unknown. In the atmosphere, 4-aminoazobenzene should exist primarily adsorbed to particulate matter and in aerosols and be subject to gravitational settling. Vapor phase 4-aminoazobenzene would degrade by reacting with photochemically produced hydroxyl radicals (half-life 5.8 hr). Human exposure is primarily in the workplace via dermal contact.
Environmental Fate TERRESTRIAL FATE: If released on land, 4-aminoazobenzene should adsorb moderately to the soil and it is likely that it will undergo soil- or clay-catalyzed oxidation . It may also biodegrade, with sufficient acclimation. No studies of degradation in soil samples were available. AQUATIC FATE: The fate of 4-aminoazobenzene in natural waters is unknown. It should adsorb strongly to sediment and undergo soil- or clay-catalyzed oxidation , photolyze, or biodegrade. Experimental data in environmental systems, however, are lacking. ATMOSPHERIC FATE: In the atmosphere, 4-aminoazobenzene would exist primarily adsorbed to particulate matter and in aerosols. Vapor phase 4-aminoazobenzene would degrade by reacting with photochemically produced hydroxyl radicals (half-life 5.8 hr). EFFL: In a comprehensive survey of wastewater from 4000 industrial and publicly owned treatment works (POTWs) sponsored by the Effluent Guidelines Division of the U.S. EPA, 522.7 ppb of 4-aminoazobenzene was identified in a discharge of the organics and plastics industry .

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