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Chemical Fact Sheet

Chemical Abstract Number (CAS #) 608935
CASRN 608-93-5
SynonymsPentachlorobenzene
Benzene, pentachloro-
Analytical Method EPA Method 8270
Molecular FormulaC6HCl5

Link to the National Library of Medicine's Hazardous Substances
Database for more details on this compound.

Use CHEM INT FOR PENTACHLORONITROBENZENE
Consumption Patterns ESSENTIALLY 100% AS A CHEM INT FOR PENTACHLORONITROBENZENE
Apparent Color Colorless crystalline solid
Odor Pleasant aroma
Boiling Point 277 DEG C
Melting Point 86 DEG C
Molecular Weight 250.14
Density 1.8342 @ 16.5 DEG C
Environmental Impact Pentachlorobenzene is used as a chemical intermediate in the production of the fungicide quintozene (pentachloronitrobenzene). It is a technical impurity of this fungicide and will enter the environment as a result of the use of quintozene. If released to the soil, it will adsorb strongly to soil and will not leach to groundwater, hydrolyze, or significantly biodegrade. A half-life of 0.5 to 1 year in soil has been reported. If released to water, it will adsorb strongly to sediments and bioconcentrate in fish. It will be subject to evaporation with a half-life of 6.5 hours estimated for evaporation from a river 1 m deep, flowing at 1 m/sec and a wind velocity of 3 m/sec. The volatilization half-life from a model pond, which considers the effects of adsorption, can be estimated to be about 60 days. It will not be expected to significantly biodegrade or hydrolyze. If released to the atmosphere, it may be transported over long distances. It may be subject to significant direct photolysis. A half-life of 271 days has been estimated for reaction with photochemically produced hydroxyl radicals. Human exposure will be from consumption of contaminated drinking water and food, and inhalation of contaminated air.
Environmental Fate TERRESTRIAL FATE: If pentachlorobenzene is released to soil, it will be expected to adsorb strongly to soil and will not be expected to leach to the groundwater. It will not be expected to be subject to significant hydrolysis or biodegrade with a laboratory half-life in soil of 0.5 to 1 year reported . Evaporation from soil is difficult to predict, but is not expected to be a significant loss process. AQUATIC FATE: If pentachlorobenzene is released to water, it will be subject to evaporation with an estimated half-life of 6.5 hours calculated for evaporation from a river 1 m deep, flowing at 1 m/sec with a wind velocity of 3 m/sec . The volatilization half-life from a model pond, which considers the effect of adsorption, can be estimated to be about 60 days(1,SRC). It will significantly adsorb to sediments and suspended particulate matter and bioconcentrate in aquatic organisms. It will not be expected to significantly biodegrade or hydrolyze. Photodegradation at the surface of waters may be significant. ATMOSPHERIC FATE: If pentachlorobenzene is released to the air, it may be carried long distances. It may be subject to significant photodegradation. A half-life of 271 days has been estimated for the reaction with photochemically produced hydroxyl radicals .
Drinking Water Impact A STUDY WAS CONDUCTED TO DETERMINE THE DISTRIBUTION OF SEVERAL ORGANOCHLORINES IN THE REGION OF THE RHINE-MEUSE ESTUARY. A SERIES OF SAMPLING STATIONS WAS ESTABLISHED. BOTTOM SEDIMENT, INTERSTITIAL AND SURFACE WATER, AND SESTON SAMPLES WERE COLLECTED. DISSOLVED PENTACHLOROBENZENE WAS LOWER IN THE ESTUARINE REGION. IT WAS PRIMARILY IN SOLUTION AND WAS A MAIN COMPOUND OBSERVED IN THE RIVERS. CONCENTRATIONS OF ALL COMPOUNDS WERE SALINITY DEPENDENT. THE CONCENTRATION OF PENTACHLOROBENZENE WAS 0.1 NG/L IN THE ESTUARY. DRINKING WATER: "Old Love Canal" area, Niagara, NY, July 1978: 9 samples, 1 pos - 240 ppb . Three cities in the Lake Ontario vicinity, 1980 - 0.03-0.05 parts per trillion . SURFACE WATER: Niagara River, total water samples, 1981, 24 samples, 13% pos - 1.0 parts per trillion max . Niagara River, Niagara-on-the Lake, 1981-83, 104 samples, 100% pos, 0.34 -

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