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Chemical Fact Sheet

Chemical Abstract Number (CAS #) 7005723
CASRN 7005-72-3
Synonyms4-Chlorophenylphenyl ether
Benzene, 1-chloro-4-phenoxy
1-Chloro-4-phenoxybenzene
Analytical Methods EPA Method 611
EPA Method 625
EPA Method 8110
EPA Method 8270
Molecular FormulaC12H9ClO

Link to the National Library of Medicine's Hazardous Substances
Database for more details on this compound.

Use Dielectric fluid
Boiling Point 284-5 deg C
Melting Point -8 deg C
Molecular Weight 204.65
Density 1.2026 @ 15 deg C
Environmental Impact 4-Chlorophenyl phenyl ether which finds use as a dielectric fluid, can be released to the environment during its manufacture, formulation, and through its use in capacitors. If released to the atmosphere, 4-chlorophenyl phenyl ether should react with photochemically produced hydroxyl radicals with an estimated half-life of 1.3 days. Direct photolysis in the atmosphere should be an important fate process, as 4-chlorophenyl phenyl ether has an absorption greater than 290 nm. 4-Chlorophenyl phenyl ether should be expected to undergo biodegradation in soil and in water. 4-Chlorophenyl phenyl ether should display slight mobility in soil, and volatilization to the atmosphere may be an important process. If released to water, 4-chlorophenyl phenyl ether would be expected to adsorb to sediment and suspended material, can volatilize to the atmosphere, and should bioaccumulate in aquatic organisms. Degradation by direct photolysis in surface water has been estimated to proceed with a half-life of 200-400 days. Volatilization from water to the atmosphere should be an important fate process. The estimated volatilization half-life for a model river is 6 hours, while from a model pond which takes into account adsorption processes, the estimated half-life is 40 days. Exposure to 4-chlorophenyl phenyl ether should be by inhalation and dermal contact which might occur during its manufacture, formulation, or use in capacitors.
Environmental Fate TERRESTRIAL FATE: If released to soil, 4-chlorophenyl phenyl ether should be expected to undergo biodegradation(1,2,3). Based on the log octanol/water partition coefficient (Kow) for 4-chlorophenyl phenyl ether, and on the water solubility , Koc values can be calculated to fall in the range 2260-3950(4,SRC), suggesting slight mobility in soil(5,SRC). Consideration of the Henry's Law constant, 8.4X10-4 atm cu-m/mol , suggests that volatilization from moist soil might be an important fate process. AQUATIC FATE: If released to water, 4-chlorophenyl phenyl ether should be expected to undergo biodegradation(1,2,3). 4-Chlorophenyl phenyl ether has an absorption maximum centered at 293 nm (in methanol) , and thus should undergo direct photochemical degradation in the upper layer of surface water. Based on laboratory rate constants obtained for 4-chlorophenyl phenyl ether in water, the calculated half-life in surface waters at 40 deg lattitude is 200 days (summer) and greater than 400 days (winter) . Based on the Henry's Law constant for 4-chlorophenyl phenyl ether, 8.4X10-4 atm cu-m/mol at 25 deg C , volatilization from water should be an active fate process. The estimated volatilization half-life for a model river is 6 hours(6,SRC). The estimated volatilization from a model pond, which takes into account adsorption processes, is 39 days(7,SRC). 4-Chlorophenyl phenyl ether should not undergo hydrolysis, but should be expected to adsorb to sediment and suspended matter. An experimentally determined BCF for rainbow trout, 736 , demonstrates that bioaccumulation in aquatic organisms can occur. ATMOSPHERIC FATE: If released to the atmosphere, 4-chlorophenyl phenyl ether, which has a maximum UV absorption at 293 nm (in methanol) , would be expected to undergo direct photochemical degradation(1,SRC). The estimated half-life for the reaction with photochemically produced hydroxyl radicals in the atmosphere is 1.3 days(2,SRC). AQUATIC FATE: It is not possible to determine the most probable aquatic fate for 4-chlorophenyl phenyl ether from available data. This pollutant is reported to be rapidly degraded by acclimated sewage sludge, but biodegradation data from river water die away experiments indicate that this cmpd has a potential for persistence in natural surface waters. Sorption by organic rich sediments & bioaccumulation in fish have been demonstrated. Although photolysis may make a minor contribution to the degradation of this pollutant near the air water surface, oxidation & hydrolysis are probably not important as fate processes. The role of volatilization is uncertain.
Drinking Water Impact SURFACE WATER: U.S. EPA Storet Data Base, for 4-chlorophenyl phenyl ether 837 samples, 0.2% positive, median concn less than 10 ug/l . Identified in two samples of water from the River Lee, United Kingdom, in concn less than 0.1 ug/l . Detected in 4 of 150 raw water extracts and 8 out of 155 finished water extracts at 11 water utilities in the Ohio River Basin, 1977-78, at concn of approx 0.2 ug/l (may have been up to 1 ug/l) . Not detected in 86 samples from 51 rainwater runoff catchments located throughout the USA (detection limits not given) . EFFL: U.S. EPA Storet Data Base, 1,333 samples, 1.1% positive, median concn less than 10 ug/L . 4-Chlorophenyl phenyl ether was not detected in 86 samples from 51 stormwater catchments located throughout the USA (detection limits not given) .

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