SPECTRUM

Chemical Fact Sheet

Chemical Abstract Number (CAS #) 72548
CASRN 72-54-8
Synonyms4,4'-DDD
Dichlorodiphenyldichloroethane
Benzene, 1,1'-(2,2-dichloroethylidene)bis[4-chloro-
TDE
Tetrachlorodiphenylethane
p,p'-DDD
Analytical Methods EPA Method 508
EPA Method 608
EPA Method 617
EPA Method 625
EPA Method 8081
EPA Method 8270
Molecular FormulaC14H10Cl4

Link to the National Library of Medicine's Hazardous Substances
Database for more details on this compound.

Use TDE LESS EFFECTIVE AGAINST MOTHS THAN DDT, BUT IT IS SUPERIOR AGAINST SOME OTHER INSECTS (EG, TOMATO HORNWORMS). SRP: FORMER USE IN USA EMPLOYED FOR CONTROLLING A NUMBER OF PESTS ON VEGETABLES & TOBACCO. IN MEDICAL ENTOMOLOGY FIELD TDE IS ABOUT EQUAL TO DDT AGAINST MOSQUITO LARVAE BUT INFERIOR AGAINST ADULTS. FORMER USE IN USA NO LONGER ANY REGISTERED USES IN USA.
Apparent Color CRYSTALS ; COLORLESS ; White solid
Boiling Point 193 DEG C AT 1 MM HG
Melting Point 109 DEG C
Molecular Weight 320.05
Density 1.385
Sensitivity Data SLIGHTLY IRRITATING TO SKIN. Irritating to nose and throat.
Environmental Impact DDD was released to the environment through its use as a non-systemic contact and stomach insecticide and as a biodegradation product of DDT. Its use in the US has been banned since the early 1970's. If released to soil it will adsorb very strongly to the soil and will not be expected to appreciably leach to the groundwater, although its presence in certain groundwater samples illustrates that it can be transported there. It will not hydrolyze in the soil and biodegradation is expected to be slow. Indirect photolysis many be substantial based upon the behavior of the related compound DDT. If released in water it will be expected to strongly adsorb to sediment and to bioconcentrate in aquatic organisms. It will not hydrolyze or directly photodegrade and biodegradation is expected to be slow. It may be subject to evaporation with a half-life of 1.82 days predicted for evaporation from a river 1 m deep, flowing at 1 m/sec with a wind velocity of 3 m/sec; however, the expected adsorption of DDD to sediments may retard the evaporation process. If released to the atmosphere, it will not be expected to directly photolyze. The estimated vapor phase half-life in the atmosphere is 1.71 days as a result of reaction with photochemically produced hydroxyl radicals. Fallout and washout will be the major removal mechanisms from the air since DDD is expected to adsorb to particulate matter. General human exposure will mainly be from consumption of contaminated food especially contaminated fish and seafoods.
Environmental Fate TERRESTRIAL FATE: EVEN AFTER MIXING SOIL TO DEPTH OF 15.24 CM /DDD RECOVERED FROM AIR ABOVE TEST PLOTS FOR LONG PERIODS. CONCN OF DDD FELL BY 2ND DAY & ONLY VERY SLOWLY & IRREGULARLY THEREAFTER, BEING MEASURABLE OVER 6 MO LATER. ONCE DDD APPLIED TO SOIL OF TEST PLOTS IT COULD BE DETECTED IN SLIGHTLY HIGHER CONCN ABOVE NON-FLOODED THAN ABOVE FLOODED PLOTS. DDD DEGRADED OR DISSIPATED SLOWLY IN AIR, WATER, & SOIL. PERSIST IN ENVIRONMENT SO SPECIES TEND TO RECEIVE CONTINUING INTAKE, ONCE ABSORBED PERSIST IN ORGANISM. TERRESTRIAL FATE: If DDD is released to soil it will adsorb very strongly to the soil and should not leach to the groundwater, although its presence in groundwater illustrates that it can be transported there. It will not appreciably hydrolyze under normal environmental conditions and biodegradation is expected to be slow. AQUATIC FATE: If DDD is released to water it will adsorb very strongly to sediment and will bioconcentrate in aquatic organisms. It will not appreciably hydrolyze or directly photolyze (estimated half-life for direct photolysis in water >150 years ) and biodegradation is expected to be slow. Indirect photolysis may be substantial, based on the behavior of the related compound DDT. Evaporation may be important with a half-life of 1.82 days predicted for evaporation from a river 1 m deep, flowing at 1 m/sec with a wind velocity of 3 m/sec; however, the expected adsorption of DDD to sediments may retard the evaporation process. ATMOSPHERIC FATE: If DDD is released to the atmosphere it will not be expected to directly photolyze. The estimated vapor phase half-life in the atmosphere is 1.71 days as a result of reaction with photochemically produced hydroxyl radicals . The major translocation mechanisms for DDD in air is fallout and washout since DDD should adsorb to particulate matter.
Drinking Water Impact DRINKING WATER: DDD: Rural Hampton County, SC, potable water supplies, 45.5% pos samples, avg 129 ppt, not detected (nd)-779 ppt; concn by land use, Hampton County (Chesterfield County), SC, drinking waters, agriculture, avg 156 ppt (66 ppt), nd-588 ppt (nd-4333 ppt), forest, avg 3 ppt (237 ppt), nd-35 ppt (nd-690), residential, avg 392 ppt (25 ppt), nd-779 (nd-112 ppt) . GROUNDWATER: p,p'-DDD: New Jersey, 1977-79, 1074 samples, 9.6% pos, max concn 0.4 ppb . DDD: California, wells, detected, not quantified . SURFACE WATER: p,p'-DDD: Hawaiian Islands, 1970-71: 4 islands, 25% pos (Oahu), 46 samples, 52% pos, range, 0.1-18.0 ppt, range of avg, not detected(nd)-7.8 ppt, overall avg pos, 3.4 ppt; waters from 13 rural areas, 0.1-10.00 ppt, avg 3.1 ppt, 24 urban areas, 0.8-18.0 ppt, avg 3.4 ppt . Columbia Basin, WA, 1961 irrigation season, detected at 2 sites, both 0.4 ppt . New Jersey, 1977-79, 604 samples, 27% pos, max concn, <0.1 ppb . US, selected western streams:

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