SPECTRUM

Chemical Fact Sheet

Chemical Abstract Number (CAS #) 75876
CASRN 75-87-6
SynonymsTrichloroacetaldehyde
Chloral
Acetaldehyde, trichloro-
Analytical Methods EPA Method 8260
Molecular FormulaC2HCl3O

Link to the National Library of Medicine's Hazardous Substances
Database for more details on this compound.

Use USED IN SPRAYING & POURING OF POLYURETHANES. CHEM INT FOR THE HERBICIDE TRICHLOROACETIC ACID, FOR CHLORAL HYDRATE. Used to induce swelling of starch granules at room temperature. Intermediate in the manufacture of DDT, methoxychlor, DDVP, naled, and trichlorofon.
Consumption Patterns ABOUT 40% AS A CHEM INT FOR THE INSECTICIDE DDT; ABOUT 10% AS A CHEM INT FOR THE INSECTICIDES METHOXYCHLOR, DDVP, AND NALED; ABOUT 50% IN OTHER APPLICATIONS (EST)(1975)
Apparent Color OILY LIQ; COLORLESS LIQUID
Odor IRRITATING ODOR
Boiling Point 97.8 DEG C @ 760 MM HG
Melting Point -57.5 DEG C
Molecular Weight 147.40
Density 1.5121 @ 20 DEG C/4 DEG C
Environmental Impact Trichloroacetaldehyde may be released to the environment as a result of a variety of industrial (chloral) processes in which it is used such as in the synthesis of methoxychlor and DVPP. It may be formed in wood processing plants in the chlorination portion of the bleaching process, so release from such plants is possible. When released to soil, trichloroacetaldehyde is expected to react with the water therein to yield chloral hydrate. In the event of a large spill, or a spill onto a relatively dry soil, a moderate amount of volatilization would be expected to occur. When released to water, the predominant reaction will be that with water to form chloral hydrate. Since this reaction is dominant it is not possible to realistically assess other fate processes. The half-life for the vapor-phase reaction of trichloroacetaldehyde with photochemically produced hydrol radicals has been estimated to be 10.77 hr at an atmosphere concn of 8X10.5 hydrol radicals per cu cm. It may also react with moisture in the atmosphere to form chloral hydrate which would be subject to rainout. Exposure to trichloroacetaldehyde will primarily be occupational.
Environmental Fate TERRESTRIAL FATE: If released on soil, trichloroacetaldehyde should react rapidly with soil moisture to form chloral hydrate, which due to its high solubility, may leach into ground water. In the result of a large release of trichloroacetaldehyde to the soil or a spill onto relatively dry soil, a moderate amount of volatilization would be expected to occur. AQUATIC FATE: When released into water, trichloroacetaldehyde will react rapidly with the water to form chloral hydrate. This will be the predominant reaction determining the environmental fate of trichloroacetaldehyde in water. Although this reaction is reversible, the equilibrium favors the product (27,000 to 1) so the trichloroacetaldehyde will be essentially removed from the medium. Volatization, bioconcentration and biodegradation of trichloroacetaldehyde are not expected to be significant. ATMOSPHERIC FATE: The half-life for the vapor phase reaction of trichloroacetaldehyde with photochemically produced hydrol radicals has been estimated to be 10.77 hr at an atmospheric concn of 8X10 5 hydrol radicals per cu cm. Since trichloroacetaldehyde rapidly reacts with water to form chloral hydrate, this reaction should occur on contact with moisture in the air. There is also a possibility that direct photolysis will occur but no data in this process were available.
Drinking Water Impact DRINKING WATER: Trichloroacetaldehyde was reported in the drinking water supplies of several US cities as follows: Philadephia, PA - 5 ug/l; Seattle, WA - 3.5 ug/l; Cincinnati, OH - 2 ug/l; Terrebonne Parish, LA - 1 ug/l; New York City, NY - 0.02 ug/l; Grand Forks, ND - 0.01 ug/l . Since trichloroacetaldehyde reacts rapidly with water to form chloral hydrate, it is probable that it was this latter compound which was in the water and that the trichloroacetaldehyde was formed during the analytical "purge and trap" procedure. SURFACE WATER: Trichloroacetaldehyde was reported at a mean concentration of 1.0 ug/l in water from the New Orleans/Baton Rouge area . Trichloroacetaldehyde was also reported but not quantified in water samples collected in 6 of 10 US cities and in one sample of surface water taken from a river or lowland reservoir in the United Kingdom . Since trichloroacetaldehyde reacts rapidly with water to form chloral hydrate, it is probable that it was this latter compound which was in the water and that the trichloroacetaldehyde was formed during the analytical "purge and trap" procedure. EFFL: Trichloroacetaldehyde was reported in the spent chlorination liquor from bleaching of sulfite pulp at high lignin content and pulp at normal lignin content after oxygen treatment (approximate concentrations of < 0.1-0.5 g/ton pulp) .

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