SPECTRUM

Chemical Fact Sheet

Chemical Abstract Number (CAS #) 76017
CASRN 76-01-7
SynonymsPentachloroethane
Ethane, pentachloro-
Analytical Methods EPA Method 524.2
EPA Method 8260
Molecular FormulaC2HCl5

Link to the National Library of Medicine's Hazardous Substances
Database for more details on this compound.

Use SOLVENT FOR OIL & GREASE IN METAL CLEANING; SEPARATION OF COAL FROM IMPURITIES. FORMER USE IN DRY CLEANING, BUT ONLY TO A SMALL EXTENT; IN SOIL STERILIZATION; IN ORG SYNTHESIS. FORMER USE Pentachloroethane is used as a solvent for cellulose acetate, certain cellulose ethers, resins and gums. Pentachloroethane is also used as a drying agent for timber immersed in it at temperatures greater than 100 deg C.
Apparent Color COLORLESS LIQUID
Odor CHLOROFORM-LIKE; CAMPHOR-LIKE
Boiling Point 161-162 DEG C
Melting Point -29 DEG C
Molecular Weight 202.29
Density 1.6796 @ 20 deg C/4 deg C
Sensitivity Data Irritation of eyes and respiratory tract .
Environmental Impact Pentachloroethane is not currently produced commercially or imported in the United States. However, this compound may be released to the environment as a combustion product of polyvinyl chloride (PVC). If released to moist soil, pentachloroethane is expected to have moderate to high mobility and it may undergo slow chemical hydrolysis. Pentachloroethane may volatilize slowly from dry soil surfaces. If released to water, volatilization appears to be an important, if not the dominant, removal mechanism (half-life 5 hours from a model river). This compound also has the potential to oxidize in the presence of light and form trichloroacetyl chloride. Moderate to slight adsorption of pentachloroethane to suspended solids and sediments may occur. Chemical hydrolysis is not expected to be environmentally important. If released to the atmosphere, pentachloroethane is expected to exist almost entirely in the vapor phase. It appears that reaction with photochemically generated hydroxyl radicals (half-life 1.2 years) would be the dominant fate process in the atmosphere. Potential products of this reaction include trichloroacetyl chloride and phosgene. Due to its persistence in the atmosphere long-range transport of pentachloroethane is expected to occur.
Environmental Fate TERRESTRIAL FATE: If released to moist soil, pentachloroethane is expected to have moderate to high mobility. This compound may undergo slow chemical hydrolysis. Pentachloroethane may volatilize slowly from dry soil surfaces. AQUATIC FATE: If released to water, volatilization appears to be an important, if not the dominant, removal mechanism. The half-life for this compound volatilizing from a model river has been estimated to be 5 hours. This compound also has the potential to oxidize in the presence of light and form trichloroacetyl chloride. Moderate to slight adsorption of pentachloroethane to suspended solids and sediments may occur. Chemical hydrolysis probably occurs too slowly to be environmentally important. ATMOSPHERIC FATE: Based on a vapor pressure of 3.5 mm Hg at 25 degC, pentachloroethane is expected to exist almost entirely in the vapor phase in the atmosphere(1,2,SRC). It appears that reaction with photochemically generated hydroxyl radicals in the atmosphere would be the dominant fate process. The half-life for this reaction has been estimated to be 1.2 years. Potential photooxidation products include trichloroacetyl chloride and phosgene. Due to its persistence in the atmosphere long-range transport of pentachloroethane is expected to occur.
Drinking Water Impact SURFACE WATER: Detected in water taken from Fields Brook in Ashtabula, OH during 1976 at a concentration of 2 ug/l . Identified in 2 out of 204 water samples collected from 14 heavily industrialized river basins located throughout the U.S., detection limit 1 ug/l . DRINKING WATER: Detected in finished drinking water collected in the New Orleans/Baton Rouge area, mean concn <0.03 ug/l, sampling date not reported . EFFL: Identified in the spent chlorination liquor from the bleaching of sulphite pulp at a concentration corresponding to 0.1 g/ton pulp process . During Aug 1972, pentachloroethane was detected in chlorinated effluent from a sewage treatment plant .

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