SPECTRUM

Chemical Fact Sheet

Chemical Abstract Number (CAS #) 85018
CASRN 85-01-8
SynonymsPhenanthrene
Analytical Methods EPA Method 525.2
EPA Method 610
EPA Method 625
EPA Method 8100
EPA Method 8270
EPA Method 8310
Molecular FormulaC14H10

Link to the National Library of Medicine's Hazardous Substances
Database for more details on this compound.

Use MFR OF DYESTUFFS; EXPLOSIVES; BIOLOGICAL RESEARCH RESEARCH CHEMICAL Synthesis of drugs and phenanthrenequinone.
Apparent Color MONOCLINIC PLATES FROM ALCOHOL; COLORLESS SHINING CRYSTALS; LEAFLETS
Odor Faint aromatic odor
Boiling Point 340 DEG C
Melting Point 101 DEG C
Molecular Weight 178.22
Density 0.9800 @ 4 DEG C
Sensitivity Data CAN CAUSE PHOTOSENSITIZATION OF SKIN.
Environmental Impact Release of phenanthrene (PHEN) most likely results from the incomplete combustion of a variety of organic compounds including wood and fossil fuels. Release to the soil will likely result in biodegradation. Volatilization is not expected to be significant. Phenanthrene is expected to bind strongly to soil and not leach extensively to groundwater. When released to water, adsorption of PHEN to suspended sediments is expected to remove most of the compound from solution. Photolysis is expected to occur near the water surface and biodegradation of phenanthrene in the water column is expected. Oxidation, volatilization and bioconcentration are not expected to be significant. Phenanthrene released to the atmosphere is expected to rapidly adsorb to particulate matter. Phenanthrene adsorbed on fly ash has been shown to photolyze rapidly (half-life 49 hr) and Phenanthrene adsorbed on particulate matter will be subject to wet and dry deposition. Vapor phase phenanthrene will react with photochemically gener ated, atmospheric hydroxyl radicals with an estimated half-life of 1.67 days. PHEN is a contaminant in air, water, sediment, soil, fish and other aquatic organisms and food. Human exposure results primarily from ingestion of food contaminated with PHEN.
Environmental Fate TERRESTRIAL FATE: The phenanthrene (PHEN) content of dried sludge added to soil decreased by 98.8% after 1280 days . The loss of PHEN was attributed to biodegradation and unidentified abiotic processes . The PHEN content of secondary wastewater decreased by

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