SPECTRUM

Chemical Fact Sheet

Chemical Abstract Number (CAS #) 86306
CASRN 86-30-6
SynonymsN-Nitrosodiphenylamine
Benzenamine, N-nitroso-N-phenyl
Analytical Methods EPA Method 607
EPA Method 625
EPA Method 8070
EPA Method 8270
Molecular FormulaC12H10N2O

Link to the National Library of Medicine's Hazardous Substances
Database for more details on this compound.

Use N-NITROSODIPHENYLAMINE IS AN EFFECTIVE RADICAL SCAVENGER, AND CAN BE USED TO STABILIZE MONOMERS, POLYMERS, AND PETROLEUM PRODUCTS. IN RUBBER PROCESSING, ITS MAJOR USE IS BELIEVED TO BE AS AN ANTI-SCORCHING AGENT, OR VULCANIZATION RETARDER, DURING RUBBER COMPOUNDING CHEM INT FOR N-PHENYL-P-PHENYLENEDIAMINE, A RUBBER CHEM Used as a rubber accelerator. Used as a staining retarder for natural and synthetic rubbers. Used as a vulcanization retarder (0.5-1.0%) in a variety of rubbers and to make p-nitrosodiphenylamine. N-NITROSODIPHENYLAMINE, USED AS AN ADDITIVE IN THE RUBBER INDUSTRY, WAS DETERMINED TO BE A POWERFUL NITROSATING AGENT, REACTING WITH OTHER AMINES PRESENT IN THE RUBBER TO FORM N-NITROSAMINES WHICH MAY BE RELEASED TO THE AIR.
Apparent Color Yellow plates from petroleum ether
Melting Point 66.5 DEG C
Molecular Weight 198.23
Density 1.23
Environmental Impact Recent information on N-nitrosodiphenylamine (NDPhA) indicates that it is no longer produced in the USA; however, one USA producer reportedly produced from 100,000 to 1,000,000 pounds in 1977. NDPhA has been used as a rubber accelerator, staining retarder for natural and synthetic rubbers, vulcanization retarder, and to make p-nitrosodiphenylamine. In soil, NDPhA is not expected to rapidly migrate (estimated Koc=1200), or be persistent. Biodegradation appears to be an important process and is affected by the organic carbon level in soil. In water, NDPhA will have a moderate tendency to partition to sediments, suspended organic matter and biota (BCF=217, bluegill sunfish). Volatilization of NDPhA from water may be a significant transport mechanism and biodegradation may also be a significant fate process for NDPhA in water. No information was found on hydrolysis or photolysis. An atmospheric half-life of 7 hours is estimated based upon reaction with hydroxyl radical. NDPhA concentration in a wastewater after primary treatment was 11 ug/l. NDPhA air concentrations at 3 different rubber processors ranged from 0.01 to 1230 ug/cu m. The most probable route and location of human exposure may be through worker inhalation at factories that process rubber.
Environmental Fate TERRESTRIAL FATE: N-nitrosodiphenylamine (NDPhA) was added to soil at a concentration of 25 ng nitroso-N/g soil (354 ug NDPhA/g soil) and it was found that 68% was lost by the end of the 30 day incubation at 30 deg C in the dark . In soil amended with wheat straw (organic matter content increased from 2.16 to 17.5%), NDPhA disappeared completely by day 10 of the incubation . If NDPhA is released to the surface of most soils, evaporation may be a significant transport mechanism (Hc = 6.4X10-4 atm-cu m/mol ). An estimated soil adsorption coefficient (KOC) for NDPhA is 1202 . Therefore, NDPhA is expected to be relatively immobile in soil . AQUATIC FATE: In water, N-nitrosodiphenylamine (NDPhA) will have a moderate tendency to partition to organic matter in sediments and suspended solids (Koc = 1202 ) and a slight tendency to bioconcentrate (BCF = 217 in bluegill sunfish ). The estimated Henry's Law constant for NDPhA is 6.4X10-4 atm-cu m/mol, indicating that volatilization from water may be a significant removal process . Based on biodegradation in static biodegradation tests and removal in activated sludge wastewater treatment plants and an aerated lagoon , biodegradation may be an important removal process for NDPhA in natural waters. No information concerning photolysis or hydrolysis was located. ATMOSPHERIC FATE: An estimated atmospheric half-life for N-nitrosodiphenylamine is 7 hours based upon reaction with hydroxyl radicals . EFFL: N-NITROSODIPHENYLAMINE HAS BEEN FOUND IN RAW WASTE SAMPLES AND SECONDARY EFFLUENT SAMPLES FROM TEXTILES PLANTS IN CONCENTRATIONS OF 2-20 UG/L. IT HAS ALSO BEEN FOUND IN EFFLUENTS FROM INK MANUFACTURING FACILITIES. N-nitrosodiphenylamine (NDPhA) was found in a wastewater after primary treatment at 11 ug/l and in the final effluent from the Los Angeles Joint Water Pollution Control Plant at < 10 ug/l.

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