SPECTRUM

Chemical Fact Sheet

Chemical Abstract Number (CAS #) 88062
CASRN 88-06-2
Synonyms2,4,6-Trichlorophenol
Phenol, 2,4,6-trichloro-
Analytical Methods EPA Method 604
EPA Method 625
EPA Method 8040A
EPA Method 8270
Molecular FormulaC6H3Cl3O

Link to the National Library of Medicine's Hazardous Substances
Database for more details on this compound.

Use HERBICIDE, DEFOLIANT SRP: FORMER USES PRESERVATIVE & DISINFECTANT (AS ISOMERIC MIXT); BACTERICIDE, GERMICIDE, & FUNGICIDE (AS ISOMERIC MIXT); SANITIZER (AS ISOMERIC MIXT). /FORMER USE WOOD PRESERVATIVE, GLUE PRESERVATIVE, INSECTICIDE INGREDIENT, BACTERICIDE AND AN ANTIMILDEW TREATMENT FOR TEXTILES SRP: FORMER USES 2,4,6-TRICHLOROPHENOL CAN ALSO BE USED TO PREPARE THE FOLLOWING FUNGICIDES (ALTHOUGH THEY ARE NOT BELIEVED TO BE PRODUCED COMMERCIALLY FROM 2,4,6-TRICHLOROPHENOL): CHLORANIL (2,3,5,6-TETRA-CHLORO-1,4-BENZOQUINONE), PENTACHLOROPHENOL AND 2,3,4,6-TETRACHLOROPHENOL. SRP: FORMER USES ANTIMICROBIAL AGENT SRP:FORMER USE
Apparent Color CRYSTALS FROM LIGROIN; YELLOW FLAKES; RHOMBIC NEEDLES FROM ACETIC ACID; Colorless needles
Odor STRONG PHENOLIC ODOR
Boiling Point 246 DEG C
Melting Point 69 DEG C
Molecular Weight 197.45
Density 1.4901
Odor Threshold Concentration 100 ug/l at 30 deg C; 1,222 ug/l at 25 deg C Purity not specified
Sensitivity Data IN CONTACT WITH EYE IT IS SAID TO CAUSE SEVERE IRRITATION & LACRIMATION. DUST OR FUMES FROM HEATING MATERIAL ARE ALSO SAID TO CAUSE PAIN & IRRITATION OF EYES & NOSE.
Environmental Impact 2,4,6-Trichlorophenol (2,4,6-T) will enter the environment as emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels and incineration of municipal wastes, as well as emissions from its manufacture and use as a wood and leather preservative and biocide. Significant amounts may result from the chlorination of phenol- containing wastewaters. Release to soil may decrease in concentration due to biodegradation, depending upon the temperature, availability of oxygen and the presence of appropriate organisms. Adsorption to soil will be significant in soils with high organic content; leaching to groundwater may be significant in sandy soils and in soils where biodegradation is not rapid. Volatilization and photomineralization may contribute to losses at the surface of the soil. Releases to water will biodegrade, photolyze, and adsorb to sediments. Volatilization from water may also contribute to losses. Although extensive bioaccumulation is not expected, it is important in some species of fish and invertebrates. Release to the atmosphere can decrease due to photolysis and reaction with hydroxyl radicals as well as wet and dry deposition mechanisms. Human exposure will result from consumption of contaminated drinking water and occupational or other contact associated with its use. Inhalation of air contaminated by emissions from combustion of wastes and fossil fuels as well as occupational contact with chlorinated phenol containing wastewater may also be significant sources of human exposure. .
Environmental Fate TERRESTRIAL FATE: If released on land, 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (2,4,6-T) would be subject to biodegradation, the rate of which will depend upon conditions, such as the temperature, availability of oxygen, and the presence of appropriate organisms. Total degradation in soils in as little as 3 days has been reported. No biodegradation was observed in soil under anaerobic conditions or in sterile soil, although significant decreases were observed by an unidentified mechanism. Moderate to extensive adsorption to soil would be expected, especially in soils with high organic content. Therefore, substantial leaching to groundwater is not expected, except in sandy soils where mobility may be significant, and in soils where rapid biodegradation does not occur. The presence of 2,4,6-T in some samples of groundwater and relatively deep in soils near pulp mills indicates that leaching through soil can be significant. Its fate in groundwater is unknown. Volatilization and photomineralization on the soil surface may also be significant mechanisms of loss whereas hydrolysis should not be a factor. . AQUATIC FATE: If released in water, 2,4,6-trichlorophenol will be subject to appreciable biodegradation; the average half-life for river water was 6.3 days, with the rate affected by the amount of sediment present. It will not hydrolyze but will be subject to appreciable adsorption to sediments. It would not be expected to appreciably bioaccumulate in most aquatic organisms, although significant bioaccumulation in certain species has been reported. Significant photodegradation near the surface is expected with a half-life of 2.1 hr reported . Volatilization may also be significant with a half-life of 2 days reported from an experimental pool . ATMOSPHERIC FATE: If released into the atmosphere, 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (2,4,6-T) will be subject to photodegradation with a half-life of less than 17 hr reported for the compound coated on silica gel and irradiated with >290 nm light. Reaction with photochemically produced hydroxyl radicals will also contribute losses (estimated half-life of 2.7 days). Significant deposition in snow is expected, and rainout as well as dry deposition may also be significant. Detection of 2,4,6-T in relatively pristine areas suggests that significant transport is possible or that 2,4,6-T may be formed in forest fires. . Terrestrial Fate: Contamination of soil in the vicinity of two Finnish sawmills using preservative (Ky-5) against blue-staining fungi that contained chlorophenols was studied. The soil around the treatment basins contained up to 70 mg chlorophenols/kg and that in the storage area for treated lumber up to 6 mg/kg. Contamination extended to a depth of at least 2 m near the treatment basins. Surface water inside the sawmill area contained the same chlorophenols as those used in wood preservation, plus some additional isomers. Chlorophenols
Drinking Water Impact DRINKING WATER: Tap water; Janakka, Finland - 30 parts/trillion 2,4,6-trichlorophenol, Jyvaskyla, Finland - 14 parts/trillion . Identified in finished US drinking water (not quantified)(2-4). Not detected in Dade County, FL drinking water (12 samples; lim detection 0.2 ppb . Not detected in midwestern US city(6). Unspecified trichlorophenol isomers

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