SPECTRUM

Chemical Fact Sheet

Chemical Abstract Number (CAS #) 96333
CASRN 96-33-3
CASRN 96-33-3
SynonymsMethyl acrylate
Analytical Method EPA Method 524.2
Molecular FormulaC4H6O2

Link to the National Library of Medicine's Hazardous Substances
Database for more details on this compound.

Use PRIMARY USE IS PRODN OF ACRYLIC & MODACRYLIC FIBERS; USED AS A COMONOMER WITH ACRYLONITRILE IN SUCH FIBERS IN DENTAL, MEDICAL, & PHARMACEUTICAL SCIENCES; UTILIZED AS MONOMER, POLYMER, OR COPOLYMER; AS MICROENCAPSULATION MIXT COMPONENT OR FOR POLYMERIZATION OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE; AS RESIN IN PURIFICATION & DECOLORIZATION OF INDUSTRIAL EFFLUENTS OR AID IN TIMED RELEASE & DISINTEGRATION OF PESTICIDES MFR LEATHER FINISH RESINS, TEXTILE & PAPER COATINGS, & PLASTIC FILMS; PRODUCES HARDEST RESIN OF THE ACRYLATE ESTER SERIES PREPN OF VIT B1
Consumption Patterns 47% FOR SURFACE COATINGS; 22% FOR TEXTILES; 7% FOR PAPER; 7% FOR POLISHES; 3% FOR LEATHER; 9% FOR ACRYLIC FIBERS; AND 5% FOR MISC APPLICATIONS (1969) ALL ACRYLIC ESTERS 45% FOR COATINGS, 16% FOR TEXTILES & LEATHER FINISHES, 9% FOR PAPER COATINGS, 8% FOR ADHESIVES, 6% FOR POLYACRYLATES, 5% FOR POLISHES, 5% FOR ACRYLIC FIBERS, 6% OTHER (1983 EST) ACRYLATES & ACRYLIC ACID
Apparent Color LIQUID ; PRACTICALLY COLORLESS
Odor ACRID ODOR ; Sharp, sweet, fruity odor
Boiling Point 80.5 deg C
Melting Point -76.5 DEG C
Molecular Weight 86.09
Density 0.9561 @ 20 DEG C/4 DEG C
Odor Threshold Concentration SMELL CAN BE DETECTED @ CONCN OF ABOUT 20 PPM Water: 0.0021 mg/l; Air: 0.0048 ul/l; odor safety class A; A= More than 90% of distracted persons perceive warning of TLV concn in the air 0.017 mg/cu m (air)
Sensitivity Data MONOMER IS HIGHLY IRRITATING TO EYES, SKIN, MUCOUS MEMBRANES.
Environmental Impact Methyl acrylate may be released into the environment in fugitive and stack emissions or in wastewater during its production and use in the manufacture of acrylic and modacrylic fibers, amphoteric surfactants, leather finish resins, textile and paper coatings, and plastic films. Small amounts of certain monomers have been found in some polymerized products which could lead to the leaching and volatilization of monomers such as methyl acrylate from the polymers. If methyl acrylate is released to soil, it will be expected to exhibit a very high mobility in soil and, therefore, it may leach to groundwater. It may hydrolyze, especially in alkaline soils based upon hydrolysis data for the structurally similar ethyl acrylate. It may biodegrade in soil based upon its biodegradability in aqueous screening tests and it may volatilize from near surface soil and other surfaces. If methyl acrylate is released to water, it will not be expected to directly photolyze, adsorb to sediment or suspended particulate matter or to bioconcentrate in aquatic organisms. Hydrolysis of methyl acrylate may be a significant process, especially in alkaline waters based upon hydrolysis data for the structurally similar ethyl acrylate. Methyl acrylate may biodegrade in natural waters based upon its biodegradability in screening tests. It will significantly volatilize from water with an estimated half-life of 6.8 hr from a model river. The volatilization half-life from a model pond, which considers the effect of adsorption, has been estimated to be 3.2 days. If methyl acrylate is released to the atmosphere, it will be expected to exist almost entirely in the vapor phase based upon a reported vapor pressure of 86 mm Hg at 25 deg C. It will not directly photoyze. It will be susceptible to photooxidation via vapor phase reaction with photochemically produced hydroxyl radicals and ozone. An atmospheric half-life of 14.5 hours at an atmospheric concentration of 5X10 5 hydroxyl radicals per cu cm and 7X10 11 ozone molecules per cu cm has been estimated. The most probable route of human exposure to methyl acrylate is by inhalation of contaminated air at or near industrial sites. Inhalation exposure to methyl acrylate containing vapors and dermal exposure to methyl acrylate containing liquids also may occur at the workplace.
Environmental Fate TERRESTRIAL FATE: If methyl acrylate is released to soil, it will be expected to exhibit a very high mobility in soil(1-3) and, therefore, it may leach to groundwater. It may hydrolyze, especially in alkaline soils based upon the hydrolyzability of ethyl acrylate . It may biodegrade in soil based upon its biodegradability in aqueous screening tests . It may volatilize from near surface soil and other surfaces. AQUATIC FATE: If methyl acrylate is released to water, it will not be expected to directly photolyze , adsorb to sediment or suspended particulate matter or to bioconcentrate in aquatic organisms(1,2). No hydrolysis data are available for methyl acrylate. Hydrolysis of methyl acrylate may be a significant process based upon hydrolytic half-lives for the structurally similar ethyl acrylate of 3.5 yr at pH 7, 100 days at pH 8, and 10 days at pH 9(4,SRC). Methyl acrylate may biodegrade in natural waters based upon its biodegradability in screening tests . It will significantly volatilize from water with an estimated half-life of 6.8 hr from a model river(2,SRC). The volatilization half-life from a model pond, which considers the effect of adsorption, has been estimated to be 3.2 days(6,SRC). ATMOSPHERIC FATE: If methyl acrylate is released to the atmosphere, it will be expected to exist almost entirely in the vapor phase based upon a reported vapor pressure of 86 mm Hg at 25 deg C . It will not directly photolyze. It will be susceptible to photooxidation via vapor phase reaction with photochemically produced hydroxyl radicals and ozone. An atmospheric half-life of 14.5 hours at an atmospheric concentration of 5X10 5 hydroxyl radicals per cu cm and 7X10 11 ozone molecules per cu cm has been estimated(1,SRC).

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